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Would the tidal forces of the star a tidally locked world orbits have any effects on the Geodynamics of the planet?

I imagine that the tidal forces would pull the crust thin at the Terminator making a weak point for magma to flow. Creating volcanos and on worlds with plate tectonics being common place for seafloor spreading and maybe even acting as a barrier for plates moving from one side of the planet to the other because said seafloor spreading.

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Would the tidal forces of the star a tidally locked world orbits have any effects on the Geodynamics of the planet?

Unless disturbed by the gravitational influence of other bodies, the tidal forces on the tidally locked world will be effectively zero.

In our own solar system, you can look at the geology of Io. Tidal forces are induced as a result of Io's eccentric orbit, and the eccentricity is caused by orbital resonances with two of its fellow Jovian moons.

I imagine that the tidal forces would pull the crust thin at the Terminator making a weak point for magma to flow

Tidal forces aren't strongest at the terminator, but lets not worry about that too much.

Io's volcanoes are, in fact, distributed across the world more than you might expect. It is believed there is a layer of molten magma under the surface that will spread heat around to some extent.

worlds with plate tectonics

Honestly, its hard to say what would happen there. There's not really a whole lot of tectonic action going on in the solar system, and the place with most of it is not tidally locked or heated.

If your world has a sufficiently runny mantle tectonics could conceivably still occur, but I don't know if a body could be tidally heated enough to that state without becoming an Io-like hellworld, too hot to have any kind of sea. A more Earthlike world with internal heat driven by radioactive decay could behave differently, but you'd have to site it carefully so that the combination of tidal heat and decay heat didn't cause a hellworld, too. That sort of positioning will reduce the influence of tidal heating, so the effects you're thinking of will be less pronounced.

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If someone is still interested, there was a paper in which said:

If plate tectonics does occur on these [tidally-locked] planets, we predict that supercontinents should be either at the substellar or anti-stellar point – depending on the initial conditions – during their formation. Facilitating the formation of hot upwellings beneath them23, 24, supercontinent are indeed expected to sit on the axis of smallest moment of inertia15, 22 which should align with the star.

A: Hot, low density (lighter shading) upwelling plumes rise and cause surface uplift. The net effect is a positive geoid/mass anomaly (exaggerated here) that coincides with the axis of the smallest moment of inertia. In contrast, cold downwellings (darker shading) are negative anomalies where the axis of largest moment of inertia will lie. B: TPW will tend to align these axes with the star-planet and rotation axes, respectively. If numerous plumes are present instead of the 2-cell pattern shown, the principal axes will be determined by the resulting degree 2 moment. Surface topography follows the reorientation. If plate tectonics occurs, continents will undergo an additional drift with respect to the mantle.

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