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I don’t want my floral humanoids nude because they evolved past that. They wear clothes made out of plants but I can’t figure what type of plants they were. It’s either:

  1. Abnormally large petals from fantasy flowers (sewed together using plant/bark thread)
  2. Bark (Native American-style)
  3. Large leaves from (sewed together with plant/bark thread)

I was thinking about them (floral humanoids-name still a work in progress) making thread from banana yucca BUT banana yucca is from dry desert area (Southwestern US and Northeastern Mexico) type environments. My floral humanoids live in forested areas. I need to do more research on banana yuccas but I believe they won’t grow in Midwest(US)-type environments. So I proposed an idea to make a banana yucca-like fantasy plant but I don’t know what else to do.

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  • $\begingroup$ I had an idea for the petal clothing: Large flowers have evolved to provide clothing for the floral humanoids. Doesn’t seem far off. I mean, it’s not anymore bizarre than the things in our world. $\endgroup$
    – Sydni
    Nov 24, 2021 at 5:37
  • $\begingroup$ Many native tribes in tropical and equatorial forests such as in Brazil would originally wear little to no clothes, while Aztecs had different clothes depending on age (kids walked completely naked). In places like japan little clothes were also the norm for a decent portion of the population during a period of their history. You might want to elaborate on what they need/use the clothes for, since "evolving past a point" doesn't seem to be the main factor or even a defining factor at all, at least not if you're basing yourself on humans, that is. $\endgroup$ Nov 24, 2021 at 17:02
  • $\begingroup$ Do your floral humanoids really need clothes made out of external materials? Could those floral humanoids grow their own clothes (e.g. leaves) to cover all places that need to be covered? It also might be easier to use pelts for clothing (especially if you want protective clothing) considering that these people live in a climate similar to the US Midwest. $\endgroup$
    – Otkin
    Nov 24, 2021 at 17:44
  • $\begingroup$ Real plants want quite a lot of surface area exposed for respiration and photosynthesis and a plant-based fantasy creature has a vastly larger metabolism to support than a non-mobile plant. Therefore, they either wouldn't want clothes or would be dressed minimally; staying fully dressed for too long might even cause them to wilt or suffer other medical issues. $\endgroup$ Nov 24, 2021 at 17:57
  • $\begingroup$ How is wearing clothes affected by evolution? We started wearing clothes to protect us against the environment and predators. I need to know why they needed clothes other than "civilized signaling." $\endgroup$
    – ShadoCat
    Nov 24, 2021 at 18:44

4 Answers 4

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What's wrong with good old-fashioned cotton? Comparatively easy to grow in temperate environments... Though I suppose if they are forest dwellers they might be more inclined towards raising silk worms; not a plant, I know, but more in line with a forested environment.

The real question, though, is what flower-people would need clothes for. Humans wear clothes to retain body heat and to cover sensitive or vulnerable areas; style come later. And these flower people endotherms (like humans), exotherms (like normal plants), or something else? What vul\nerable areas would they want to protect? Or do they only wear clothes for style and decoration? Answer those questions, and the materials they are likely to use will be more obvious.

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  • $\begingroup$ I guess they can use cotton. Silk worms could be an option as well. The reason why they were close is to cover nude parts (and maybe for decorate purposes but it’s more practical) and they are endotherms like humans. $\endgroup$
    – Sydni
    Nov 24, 2021 at 16:30
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They can use jute fiber

Jute is a long, soft, shiny bast fiber that can be spun into coarse, strong threads. It is produced from flowering plants in the genus Corchorus, which is in the mallow family Malvaceae. The primary source of the fiber is Corchorus olitorius, but such fiber is considered inferior to that derived from Corchorus capsularis.

Jute is one of the most affordable natural fibers, and second only to cotton in the amount produced and variety of uses. Jute fibers are composed primarily of the plant materials cellulose and lignin. Jute fiber falls into the bast fiber category (fiber collected from bast, the phloem of the plant, sometimes called the "skin") along with kenaf, industrial hemp, flax (linen), ramie, etc.. The industrial term for jute fiber is raw jute. The fibers are off-white to brown, and 1–4 metres (3–13 feet) long. Jute is also called the "golden fiber" for its color and high cash value.

The jute plant needs a plain alluvial soil and standing water. The suitable climate for growing jute (warm and wet) is offered by the monsoon climate, during the monsoon season. Temperatures from 20 to 40 °C (68–104 °F) and relative humidity of 70%–80% are favourable for successful cultivation. Jute requires 5–8 cm (2–3 in) of rainfall weekly, and more during the sowing time. Soft water is necessary for jute production.

Another alternative could be hemp

Hemp fiber has been used extensively throughout history, with production climaxing soon after being introduced to the New World. For centuries, items ranging from rope, to fabrics, to industrial materials were made from hemp fiber. Hemp was also commonly used to make sail canvas. The word "canvas" is derived from the word cannabis. Pure hemp has a texture similar to linen. Because of its versatility for use in a variety of products, today hemp is used in a number of consumer goods, including clothing, shoes, accessories, dog collars, and home wares. For clothing, in some instances, hemp is mixed with lyocell.

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  • $\begingroup$ Interesting! Jute and hemp could defiantly be used as thread. They’re nice alternatives to the banana yucca plant! $\endgroup$
    – Sydni
    Nov 24, 2021 at 5:37
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    $\begingroup$ Jute and hemp requires the desecration of the cadavers of fellow plants (and linen too) - put them in water, let them rot a while, but not too long for the fibers to rot too; then take those rotten bodies, let them dry and beat the heck out of them to drive the rotten matter away). Try cotton - at least the use of cotton fibers is like kicking out the kids of fellow plant from their home. $\endgroup$ Nov 24, 2021 at 5:53
  • $\begingroup$ @AdrianColomitchi or simply close the loop by fertilizing the plants with the cadavers of those who wore them $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Nov 24, 2021 at 5:59
  • $\begingroup$ I'd go with the acceptance of parasites to provide the cover, something like silkworms. The only thing that stops me short to consider it further is the association of nudity and parasites - too close an imagery to pubic lice, see? :grin: $\endgroup$ Nov 24, 2021 at 6:03
  • $\begingroup$ @Adrian Colomitchi yeah I don’t want to have that kind of imagery lol $\endgroup$
    – Sydni
    Nov 24, 2021 at 16:33
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Another alternative is flax. It has been used since antiquity to produce linen for clothing & to produce sail cloth.

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  • $\begingroup$ Oooo I’ll look at flax as well! $\endgroup$
    – Sydni
    Nov 24, 2021 at 16:32
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Barkcloth

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barkcloth

Barkcloth was made in many locations, prior to being displaced by woven textiles. It is made of the inner bark of a variety of trees - mulberry trees in Asia and Australia / New Guinea, and ficus trees in Uganda.

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/bark-cloth-textile-clothing-unesco

barkcloth

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/bark-cloth-textile-clothing-unesco

First, Luemba takes a sharp knife and carves a makeshift chisel out of the core of a banana tree. The banana-pith shiv is wet and dripping with a gelatinous resin. Luemba says this is the secret to not hurting the mutuba tree. He approaches a skinny sapling and scrapes off the dark outer bark. He then slices into the inner layer of bark with his steel knife and gently pries off the square of cambium using the banana chisel. Luemba carefully coats the bare trunk with more of the resin and wraps it up with a banana leaf.

“The tree is not harmed,” he says. “That bark will grow back in one year.”

barkcloth

Model in modern barkcloth fashion from above linked article.

I am comfortable in cotton as I type and I own a linen jacket made of flax. I am not particularly edgy in my fiber choices. If your fictional flower people are agriculturists they can grow fiber crops as lots of real people do. Usually that is too banal for a fiction and authors want their invented people to have some different relationship with the land. Barkcloth is more exotic than cultivated fibers but not totally fantastic like clothes made from pressed pollen. You can read about how actual people made (and are again making) barkcloth then have your flower people riff on that, using the trees you invent for their forest home.

Pressed pollen felt idea is now making me think...

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  • $\begingroup$ Barkcloth is an interesting idea! I need to do more research on it. It reminds me of bark skirts that Native American women wear. $\endgroup$
    – Sydni
    Nov 24, 2021 at 21:33

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