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Well, in order to give some background, basically the army of this fictional country is taking military training to its limits, but not in the traditional manner. For example: One of the first steps of this training is to put its cadets on armours that cause a weak, continuous and almost painless electrical discharge on their soldier skins in order to force their bodies to make it more thick and thus, more resistant. Something that could take months or years of training for a common person to achieve (like a martial artist, a professional boxer etc).

And so, one of the characteristics of a athletes is that, due to the constant physical exercises, their veins become larger to allow a better blood flow through the body. A characteristic that soldiers also develop due to the exercises a soldier makes, but it also takes time (something that this army is trying to save).

Having this in mind, it would be realistic to say with this "physical machine assisted training" could allow soldiers to have more resistant veins, so it is harder to suffer from internal bleeding? Even if the bleeding is inside their heads? Or this just taps on genetic engineering field?

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The human body is pretty resilient and can do amazing things to resist damage. After repeated injuries is can develop thicker skin, thicker bone material, extra fluid in injured areas, such as around the brain and even scar tissue can help minimize future damage.

However, this can come at a cost. the underlining tissues do not really develop a tolerance to such trauma. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_traumatic_encephalopathy develops from repeated head injuries. The body may develop protection to minimize damage, but the brain tissue will still become damaged over time.

You can train your soldiers to be resilient in the face of injuries, but in their veteran years, they will be significantly broken. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3706825/ here is an article about long term effects of head injuries of boxers.

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    $\begingroup$ I should add an example. Boxers can train to take damage. George Foreman took hits to the dome from Mike Tyson and basically is unfazed. You, however, taking a hit from Tyson wont end as well. But then look at these two men. Their mental health will most definitely suffer due to the consequences of their chosen profession. $\endgroup$
    – Sonvar
    Nov 19 '21 at 20:40

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