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An extremely powerful wizard decided to create a new dimension as a birthday present for his wife, this dimension is composed of flying islands inhabited by fantastic plants and animals. The islands are rich in minerals that produce a weak gravity, enough for whoever is on it not to fly around and land gently on the ground, but not too strong for the islands not to collide and form moons and planets. The atmosphere is composed of the same gases as the Earth's (only purer since there was no pollution). There are no stars, just a ball of light that emits the same rays as the sun, but it has no gravity and is not made of plasma. I hope I have given all the necessary details, now the question: how to cycle day and night in such a dimension?

Some restrictions: the pseudo Sun cannot disappear, it has to continue to exist. You can't hide the pseudo Sun under the islands, the light would still be too strong and it wouldn't be possible to create a night. Clouds are not dense enough to block light. You can use solutions that involve magic, as long as you give an explanation of how such magic works. The pseudo Sun has to go around the world, rising at one point on the horizon and setting at another. Something similar to Minecraft's SkyBlock.

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  • $\begingroup$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Oct 29, 2021 at 21:08
  • $\begingroup$ I imagine the work I will have to explain it all over again... $\endgroup$ Oct 29, 2021 at 21:56

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There is something like a swarm of islands around the orb whose position pulse inward and outward to and away from the orb on a 24 hour cycle. What's so special about them that they act like this is uncertain, but to summarize what they actually accomplish with this pulsating activity is that as they move outwards they create empty spaces between them, allowing the light of the orb through for as long as it is 'day', and as they move inward they slot into each other like the pieces of a carefully designed puzzle, blocking the light of the orb in their encasement of it for as long as it is 'night'

It aint much, but here's a visual presentation: enter image description here

Edit 1: Damn, forgot that there are no stars... oh well, not redoing it.

Edit 2: Also forgot the bit that it has to go along the sky to simulate a rise and set... might as well delete it at this point, but I will point out that this wizard might do this sort of thing anyway to have the sun be open as it goes across the sky, be enclosed on one end of the horizon, become a moon of sorts as the light is intense enough to barely shine through and cause a very pale light, go back across the sky as the moon, and open up to become the sun on the other end of the horizon again, restarting the cycle all over again as the orb becomes the sun and the moon in a continuous back and forth cycle.

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  • $\begingroup$ You can achieve the rising and setting by slowly spinning the islands rather than moving the sun. $\endgroup$
    – Jontia
    Oct 29, 2021 at 21:51
  • $\begingroup$ The islands are not close together to have this effect, unless you refer to what the Rubrikon said. $\endgroup$ Oct 29, 2021 at 21:58
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  1. The pseudo-Sun only emits light from it's bottom half which always points "down". Therefore we would start to see the light just as it comes over the "horizon" and we would see more and more as it rises and less as it sets. When it is below the horizon there would be no light rays pointing upwards and nothing to reflect the light pointing down.

  2. Don't think clouds are dense enough to block light?

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2015/04/17/07/27A7EC4800000578-3043071-The_sandstorm_was_so_thick_the_city_was_plunged_into_darkness_du-a-10_1429252656411.jpg

Here's a picture someone took in the middle of the day during a sandstorm. If this magician is powerful enough to create a pocket dimension with their own gravity rules and a fake sun, I'm sure they can manage to create a thick layer of fog or dust under the islands to block most of the light when the pseudo-Sun dips under the horizon. (it would actually make for some beautiful sunsets too)

  1. Just make it dimmer! The sun is fake after all! When the wizard creates this sun (however they do it) they could probably insert a timing mechanism of some sort that dims and brightens the glow at set intervals corresponding with the rise and setting of the sun.

  2. How big is this pseudo-sun? If rather small, the magician could create a large 'sheet' of material waaaaay down below the islands that could just block the light under the horizon. And in case his wife manages to fall off an island while frolicking around, it could double as a safety net so that she isn't falling into the void for eternity!

Hope this helped!

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The Duat

The islands "fly" by floating on Neptune-deep seas of an invisible, intangible giant planet, named Duat. (Duat has a small tangible core, no more than ten times the size of the Earth, by the name of Mongo, but that is a story for another day) The point is, as the Sun follows its appointed path around the islands, it descends into the intangible sea of Duat. This does not shade or extinguish its light, but the Sun tends to phase deeper and deeper into that dimension the deeper it goes physically. As a result, the bulk of its light appears in the other world and not on your islands when it is in the sea beneath them, giving the impression that there is a very dark night. The natives of Duat naturally object to the thoughtless wizardly imperialism that has so ravaged their world, but so far their Apophis Project has failed to make an impact. They will continue fighting on.

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The islands, which we choose to live on, all rotate slowly on one axis relative to the stationary light source. Thus although the light continues to shine from its permanent home in the heights, we rotate under it, making it look like it moves from horizon to horizon during half of each spin and remains hidden under us during the other half.

There are islands which spin on less perpendicular angles to the sun and those which don't spin at all, but we don't choose to live there since we like cycles of day and night. We do however use the tops of the non-rotating islands for farming as they suffer no cold seasons and have twice as much sunlight as everywhere else.

...and there is a wild amusement park on that topsy turvy spinning rock over there.

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  • $\begingroup$ Plants like day/night cycles too. $\endgroup$
    – Monty Wild
    Oct 29, 2021 at 9:14

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