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I've been looking around the internet but I can't seem to find out how fluoride salts would form naturally. My end goal is for my planet to have a mildly high concentration of hydrofluoric acid pools, and my idea was to utilize the already-abundant amount of sulfuric acid to combine with fluoride salts. Villiaumite would work but it would be preferable if the salts would form on the surface and be more readily available.

Could I just handwave it and have it still sound mostly plausible that there's fluoride salts growing in abundance on the surface, or is there a simple reason that'll work instead? If not, is there an easier way to achieve high concentrations of hydrofluoric acid?

Potentially relevant info about the planet: It's surface temperature is an average of 461ºK (~187ºC), it's atmosphere is high in sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, and chlorine, and it's around 1.5 times as dense as earth (atmosphere is twice as dense).

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Here is some sodium fluoride.

sodium fluoride https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Villiaumite

It is rare.

Here is some calcium fluoride. It is less rare.

calcium fluoride

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorite

Both are concentrated via hydrothermal liquids and then crystallize out.

It sounds like geothermal pools would not be out of place on your world. The pools would probably not be pure hydrofluoric acid but a mix of hydrofluoric and other (sulfuric, hydrochloric) acids.

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    $\begingroup$ Oh, this works perfectly! I planned on having numerous geothermal features on the planet anyway, but I didn't know sodium and calcium fluoride were formed through hydrothermal activity, so I hadn't considered that. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 1:05
  • $\begingroup$ @vanadium-beryl remember, if the answer works, you can check it off. $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 21, 2021 at 8:51
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Fluorine is a chemical element with the symbol F and atomic number 9. It is the lightest halogen and exists at standard conditions as a highly toxic, pale yellow diatomic gas. As the most electronegative element, it is extremely reactive, as it reacts with all other elements, except for argon, neon, and helium.

Fluorine, as said above, is an halogen element, halogen being a term of Greek origin, meaning "which form salts".

Therefore it is possible to have fluorine based salts.

Among the elements, fluorine ranks 24th in universal abundance and 13th in terrestrial abundance.

In the solar system it's even the most abundant halogen, therefore I don't see any problem with having an abundance of fluorine based salts in your world.

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