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In my world there are a relatively large and wealthy subset of the population who, instead of a humanoid pair of eyes, have independent eyes like a chameleon. These eyes have the unique lenses, musculature, and supporting visual system of a chameleon, and therefore their depth perception is similarly monocular

This presents a problem regarding 3D films; as these films usually exploit stereoscopic vision, these chameleon people would be unable to view these films

Is there any other way to display 3D films that's work for these beings?

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    $\begingroup$ Why wouldn't they be able to view the films? Just make a simple experiment: run such a film and close one eye. Do you suddenly stop seeing the film? (Technical explanation: monocular depth perception is not really different from watching a conventional moving picture filmed with a large depth of field. For more than a century nobody complained that such films were unwatchable.) In fact, one of my pet peeves with respect to 3D movies is that many cinematographers carry over their 2D habits and show bizarre 3D sequences filmed with shallow DoF. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Oct 14, 2021 at 12:51
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    $\begingroup$ Chameleons use both eyes when aiming, you know? They do use their eyes independently to scout around for both prey and predators, but once they spotted prey they'll immediately lock both eyes on it to maximize depth perception and the information they receive so they can strike as accurately as they can. If you want more info, here's an accurate but fun video. $\endgroup$ Oct 14, 2021 at 16:44

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Your assumption does not make sense

Chameleons can move their eyes independently and focus monocularly on things. But they can also point both eyes to a same target and see it binocularly. They have amazing good depth perception, which they use to shoot their tongue at targets.

An intelligent species with chameleon eyes could watch our human 3D movies by pointing both eyes forward and using 3D glasses just like we do. The glass shape might have to be different to accommodate for their face shape but the basic principle remains the same.

But if you really want to give them the most immersive experience - I went to Universal Studios some 20 years ago and they had a 360° cinema. It was an amazing experience, but we humans have the limitation that we have to constantly turn our heads to see stuff from all angles. Your chameleon people might have better value for their money in such cinemas.

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  • $\begingroup$ A chameleon (nor a chameleon-sighted humanoid) could not use stereoscopic vision due to the structure of the visual processing system $\endgroup$ Oct 14, 2021 at 16:04
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    $\begingroup$ @IchthysKing wherever did you read that? $\endgroup$ Oct 14, 2021 at 16:15
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    $\begingroup$ A 360° cinema - without special measures - has nothing to do with stereoscopic vision. It is a surround view, projected in 2D. They would love it indeed. But I don't see any reason why a chameleon wouldn't be able to interpret stereoscopy. It would strain the animal, because it is not used to focus on prey all the time. A 3D stereo view without prey could be difficult to maintain. Stereo view in a cameleon is only meant to catch prey, the normal view is 360 degrees and it can even follow two preys independently reuters.com/article/… $\endgroup$
    – Goodies
    Oct 14, 2021 at 18:03

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