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I've always seen things in fiction and in the Quran where the moon was split in half. Then, it got me to thinking, how much force, if there is even a formula for this and if so point me in its direction, is needed to split the moon in two? I'd assume the end product would be something in Joules or Mega/Gigatons of TNT.

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marked as duplicate by a CVn Jul 30 '15 at 9:04

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    $\begingroup$ Are you trying to get a clean cut, or is simply destroying it good? Simply tossing that many explosives in the centre is not going to halve it, you're going to end up with lots of debris. $\endgroup$ – Theik Jul 30 '15 at 7:36
  • $\begingroup$ Give me a place to stand, and I shall move the Earth with it - Archimedes $\endgroup$ – mouviciel Jul 30 '15 at 7:58
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    $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome, even if you somehow managed to overcome the gravitational binding energy of the moon the result as Theik (+1)pointed out you will get 2 to the power of whatever integers you like pieces of moon rocks So how bout I treat u a drink and u spare the moon deal? $\endgroup$ – user6760 Jul 30 '15 at 8:06
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Curious Researcher, and welcome to the site. This type of question has come up a few times before, and some answers include the specific math that you would be able to apply to any celestial body of your choice. Also as pointed out, by just blowing up the moon, you won't get a clean cut but rather a huge cloud of debris (which will, to a large part, eventually re-coalesce). Look at The opposite to Worldbuilding: World Destruction and How can I destroy a gas giant planet? for a start. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Jul 30 '15 at 9:01
  • $\begingroup$ For the time being, I'm putting this on hold as a duplicate of the former. If you feel that your question really isn't answered by the answers to that one, I suggest that you edit your question to illuminate the differences between the two. $\endgroup$ – a CVn Jul 30 '15 at 9:04

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