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A scientific paper last year proposed the idea of cosmic string life-forms which could flourish within stars.

The basic idea is that cosmic strings,theoretical topological defects from the early universe could have survived to the current age. 1 dimensional strings of diameter less than an proton with immense densities comparable to the singularity of a black hole. Combined with magnetic monopoles they could create a network similar to DNA and possibly complex forms of life.

For my question I want to concentrate on the networks Cosmic strings can form with primordial black holes, specifically micro blackholes as this would fit the scale of a life-form or cosmic strings in a network with magnetic monopoles, as suggested in the paper. The scale of the string and beads (Bh or monopoles) network will be varying sizes from a 1 meter in height or width to hundreds of meters.

A cosmic string network could contain up to a kilometre of strings or more, given that a kilometre long cosmic string would have the same mass as the earth each network should have a very strong gravitational effect on light.

What would be the effect of the gravity from the strings on the surrounding background of space, assuming other stars or galaxies were behind it to be visually deformed?

In theory space-time around Cosmic strings will be conical, with the tip of the cone running along the line, I am not sure if this means it will appear cylindrical along the line from a distance?

For reference see the image below of how a network could appear, for my story I envision they could form any shape including that of other life-forms. My main concern is would the strings at close range (but in tension so their gravitational force means they do not collapse) visually have a collective gravitational field similar to one black hole of the same size as the collective network or would the visual effect on the background be individual warping around each string with some form of collective effect for strings close together?

image by Saranga Buwaneka Via https://www.behance.net/gallery/4271271/Cosmic-Strings image by Saranga Buwaneka Via https://www.behance.net/gallery/4271271/Cosmic-Strings

Links: http://journals.andromedapublisher.com/index.php/LHEP/article/view/166/85 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_string

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  • $\begingroup$ The conical description is just a way of describing it for the human mind. Make the cone out of rubber. Don't make it too pointy. Squish it flat. The outer edges would stretch and the center would be compressed. That squishing and stretching creates an illusion of mass around the cosmic string, essentially making it a 1-dimensional black hole (unlike a singularity, which is a 0-dimensional black hole). The models I've seen insist that you would have two undistorted images of the background, one on either side. This would make your tangle very chaotic. $\endgroup$ Apr 15 at 15:57

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First, let me explain what a cosmic string is. A cosmic string is a topological defect that can form during a phase transition in the early universe. The simplest example of a phase transition is when water freezes into ice. As the water molecules slow down and stop moving, they form a lattice structure. This is because the water molecules are attracted to each other and want to be as close together as possible.

However, sometimes the molecules don't have enough time to arrange themselves into a perfect lattice. In this case, you can end up with defects in the lattice. One type of defect is called a disclination, which is where the molecules are not arranged in a perfect hexagonal pattern. Another type of defect is called a dislocation, which is where the molecules are not arranged in a perfect straight line.

In the early universe, there were many phase transitions as the temperature cooled down. These phase transitions could have created defects in the fabric of space-time itself. One type of defect that could have formed is called a cosmic string.

A cosmic string is basically a one-dimensional object. It can be thought of as a line or a loop of energy that is stuck in our three-dimensional world. The energy of a cosmic string comes from the Higgs field, which is responsible for giving particles their mass.

The size of a cosmic string can vary from extremely small (much smaller than an atom) to extremely large (many light years across). The size of the string depends on how much energy was stored in the Higgs field at the time of the phase transition.

The density of a cosmic string can also vary depending on its size. For example, a very small string might have a density similar to that of an ordinary particle, while a very large string might have a density comparable to that of a black hole.

Cosmic strings can interact with each other and with other objects in space-time. For example, if two strings cross each other, they will create loops of string that will eventually decay away by emitting gravitational waves. If a string passes close to another object (such as a star or planet), it will cause that object to be pulled towards it by gravity.

The gravity of a cosmic string can also distort space-time around it. This effect is known as "gravitational lensing". If you look at an object through a gravitational lens created by a cosmic string, you would see multiple images of that object - one for each path that the light takes around the string.

So, what would be the effect of the gravity from the strings on the surrounding background of space? If there were other stars or galaxies behind it, they would be gravitationally lensed by the strings. This means that you would see multiple images of those objects - one for each path that the light takes around the string(s).

The size and shape of the images would depend on the properties of the string(s), such as their size, density, and how they are moving. If the strings are very dense, then the images would be very distorted. If the strings are very large, then the images would be very spread out. And if the strings are moving very fast, then the images would be streaked.

So, to answer your question: yes, the gravity of a cosmic string network would have a noticeable effect on the background light from other stars and galaxies.

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