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I haven’t really ever gotten this far in worldbuilding, and I’m kinda stuck on ocean currents. My world has lots of tiny little islands that are on 2 slightly submerged continents (around 3 metres below sea level): would the currents just act the same as if they weren’t submerged? Also, my planet has a 12-hour rotational period and is 0.87 percent earth’s size and mass everything else is the same.

I have change my atmospheric circulation so that it’s three cells per hemisphere and have also changed the currents accordingly (image below)enter image description here

I have finished the main ocean currents, but I still need help with the currents on the submerged continents. Is this alright?enter image description here

Image of Submerged Continents:enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Shallow water will definitely affect your current speeds, directions and temperatures. Can you highlight on the map or at least try describe roughly where your sunken continents are? $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 12:01
  • $\begingroup$ Good God! DoI read it the wrong way or do you really mean the wind circulation change direction twice, West-East-West, over the span of about +/-5 degrees latitude around the ecuator? And those winds are supposed to be sorta permanent? Because, if the later, my mind shuts down thinking an the shallow mass of pretty warm water pumping heat in an atmosphere so prone to whirlwinds, the storms there should put the tornado alley to shame. $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 12:09
  • $\begingroup$ @AdrianColomitchi I took that to be a representation of the pretty standard equatorial and counter-equatorial currents. Ie doldrums. $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 12:18
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the map edits. $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 12:47
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    $\begingroup$ This helped me a lot with my ocean currents: m.youtube.com/watch?v=n_E9UShtyY8 $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 18:25

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I assumed sunken continents are what I marked with black dotted lines I marked hot currents in red and cold in blue, as far as I understand they should behave

enter image description here

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I'm no oceanographer, but I would say that your submerged continents would affect ocean currents as if they weren't submerged. Surface currents generally run as deep a 400 meters, so it's entirely reasonable that your continents being around 3 meters below sea level would exert an effect on surface currents. Deep water currents would naturally be affected. Of course your sunken continents would still have currents flowing across them, possibly faster than your ocean currents, and possibly in bizarre directions depending on the topology. Take a look at the Gulf of Mexico Loop Current and the eddies it creates here: https://texaspelagics.com/gom-info/gom-loop/ for some ideas. As far as your polar regions, wind currents are one of the primary drivers of ocean currents, so your polar currents would in all likelihood be eastward as well. This is of course assuming your world is NOT a rotating sphere in which there is a Coriolis effect to drive the wind and currents different directions as they do on Earth.

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  • $\begingroup$ " assuming your world is NOT a rotating sphere" Huh? If it's not a rotating sphere, what is it - a planet with a day as long as an year? $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 12:16
  • $\begingroup$ Can you please elaborate further? I don’t really understand how it’ll work because the Gulf of Mexico only has one side open to sea but the submerged continents have all sides open to sea. How would it work with all sides open to sea? $\endgroup$
    – Katze
    Oct 4, 2021 at 15:00
  • $\begingroup$ @ SN9 Think of the Indonesian and neighbouring islands. That's a warm shallow sea open from East, West and South. $\endgroup$ Oct 4, 2021 at 16:34
  • $\begingroup$ @EveryBitHelps I took some inspiration from the Indonesian ocean currents, and added a map with them on it. Do they look alright? $\endgroup$
    – Katze
    Oct 5, 2021 at 10:14

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