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Listen closely my apprentice, as this may well save your life! Or your customers, rather. And line your pockets to boot.

We follow the story of a daring young adventurer, on a quest to defeat the monster plaguing his home village! With deft skills and his newly purchased spear, he bests the growling monster in the forest outside of town. Unfortunately, that monster's blood is emitting a sickly yellow-green gas as it bubbles on the ground. As he begins to cough, he all too late begins to realize why the village elders insisted on hiring the professional monster hunters, despite the steep cost...

As you surely know, the monsters in this land come from a different world, where their blood has high amounts of dissolved chlorine gas. This is beneficial in their world, but the moment their blood spills, it becomes a deadly hazard to any earth-based life. Professional monster hunters of course, will be needing their own way of neutralizing this gas when they stop by our shop!

Remember, magic can transmute matter and energy! Our specially made crystals, when activated, can continually do so. In this case however, we need a crystal that will produce something in the air to neutralize that deadly chlorine gas!

Now what, my apprentice, could do such a thing? Remember how I showed you that two hydronium crystals and one oxegenium crystal could create water when linked? The possibilities are endless! My crystals can form any element or any simple compound in a 5ft radius around the user, one mote at a time, quickly enough to form a very thin vapor or cloud. What element, compound, or combination thereof will you use, hmm?

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4 Answers 4

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Two options

  1. The obvious answer is sodium, when this reacts with the chlorine gas, it will make simple table salt. However... sodium does react with other things, so unless the magic can be selective, the reaction between sodium and any water that may also be around would produce hydrogen gas which could result in a deadly fireball. This would be more of a concern in enclosed spaces where the hydrogen could accumulate, and for open field combat, this side effect probably wouldn't matter.

  2. The safer answer is activated carbon, essentially charcoal. It's not nearly as clean of a solution, but it also has the advantage of being useful against a wider variety of other toxins as well.

I think we sell both, and charge a heavy premium for the broad spectrum "activated carbon" solution.

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  • $\begingroup$ The data I found suggests you would need ~3.7 tonnes of activated Carbon for every kg of Chlorine you had to absorb and you'd have to wait until it had reacted with atmospheric moisture to capture it too, Sodium bursts into flames on contact with the air though so it's not really an option except for the truly desperate. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    Commented Sep 10, 2021 at 7:31
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Mathaddict's answers are both good, there is another option that doesn't require selective magic or finely divided carbon that someone may not have the skill to nuance properly, a lump of solid carbon won't help you nearly fast enough after all. Instead use water, lots and lots of water, the first flush of water will be a fine mist, for maximum reactive surface area, to bind the chlorine gas in the air as hydrochloric acid. Extra water can then be used to dilute that product so it isn't harmfully concentrated. Better still if there is a way to trap the product at a high, and dangerous, concentration, then you can get paid to "dispose" of this "harmful byproduct", by using it for all sorts of production processes around the shop.

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  • $\begingroup$ In WWI , chlorine gas attacks were quite effective even during rain. Yes, it does speed the clearing of the gas, but nowhere near the tempo needed for a human to survive near the source. Instead of the gas cloud remaining lethal for two hours, hard rain cleared it to safe levels in just 40 minutes. $\endgroup$
    – PcMan
    Commented Sep 10, 2021 at 7:10
  • $\begingroup$ @PcMan I was assuming that the water started as mist which would have a huge particle surface area and absorb a lot more chlorine than rain, I should have made that clear. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    Commented Sep 10, 2021 at 7:12
  • $\begingroup$ You need at least 330 liters of liquid water, to absorb 1 kg of chlorine. this sounds very impractical to me. $\endgroup$
    – PcMan
    Commented Sep 10, 2021 at 7:16
  • $\begingroup$ @PcMan We are talking about magic so impractical yes and? It would apparently take 3.7 metric tonnes, or more, of activated charcoal to absorb that same kg of chlorine, and it would have to be in aqueous solution and not as a gas for it to work at all; the ~630g of sodium would be better but there are complications with that. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    Commented Sep 10, 2021 at 7:24
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Remember, magic can transmute matter and energy! Our specially made crystals, when activated, can continually do so.

The solution is mindbogglingly simple, within this ruleset.

Cast spell "Transmute Gaseous Chlorine to Argon"

ENd of answer.

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  • $\begingroup$ Brilliant! Truly brilliant! Best answer by far! $\endgroup$
    – Alendyias
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 0:26
  • $\begingroup$ p.s. argon, because the end result is also a gas, chemically inoffensive, occupies a similar volume of space (thus no concussive effect during change), and requires only the addition of a single electron into the nucleus to achieve the transmutation yet producing neither radioactive result isotope nor radiation particles in the changeover. Surely that must be the least possible effort of any elemental transmutation spell! $\endgroup$
    – PcMan
    Commented Sep 12, 2021 at 6:58
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Sodium Hydroxide

Well, what you get out of the reaction depends on whether the $NaOH$ is concentrated or dilute. So the mist would probably include $NaOH$ and plenty of water. Assuming it’s dilute, you would get salt ($NaCl$) and bleach $NaClO_3$. This might be a better, less reactive alternative to elemental sodium.

If you have plenty of water, you could also use urea instead. If situations get desperate, even the urea from, well, urine. Though that would only be enough to act as a sort of gas-mask.

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