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The planet is Earth-like with gravity: 1.05 Earth's, an Atmosphere of N2: 94% / H2O: 1% / CO2: 1% / Ar: 3% / 1% Other gases with 1 atm pressure at sea level, 40% of the land is H2O water, there is tectonic plates + a magnetic field, Earth-like temperature, and 48-hour day.

There are no lunar tides on the planet (tidally locked to a massive moon) and also No life.

So what material that people could get from this planet? and what are the most important materials that people may need from this planet.

Feel free to edit anything besides those properties, and what could I do to have more important materials on this planet?

by "important materials" I mean for example materials that could be used as fuel, to make technology (like phones and computers), nuclear energy, building houses, and maybe space ships. Also which materials will be very abundant.

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  • $\begingroup$ If the planet does not have life it has nothing that cannot be gotten far cheaper and easier from asteroids. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Aug 26, 2021 at 14:40
  • $\begingroup$ very relevant question, worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/10746/… $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Aug 26, 2021 at 14:45

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Sounds like your planet would have similar minerals to Earth.

The inner planets of our Solar System have similar minerals, just slightly different proportions. Atmospheres may vary, and there may be differences in core temperatures / surface features, but in general they are fairly consistent.

Planets that are much larger and have stronger gravity would tend to be gas giants, or planets further away from their star would be ice giants. There is a whole study on planetary formation, called Planetary Science, of which the formation and composition is studied.

In terms of what minerals would be useful, it of course depends on the goals of the user. But as a starting point:

  • Of the uses you are describing, you need a broad range of minerals from metals such as iron, gold, copper, zinc etc. to gases such as helium, oxygen, hydrogen etc. Even an isolated industry like electronics requires a very broad range of resources.
  • For more 'important' minerals that may make the planet desirable to mine, you could have higher proportions of heavier metals, such as uranium, as these metals are not easy to fuse via gravity in stellar formation / supernova so are rarer, plus may have useful properties for instance useable in fission reactors.
  • Otherwise, the natural state of many minerals is oxidised or combined with other elements - meaning it may be an advantage to mine if there are more pure elements requiring less refining.
  • If your planet really is special, it could contain lots of lithium as this element is generally from the Big Bang and is particularly rare and, because of its reactivity, useful for many engineering applications.

In general though, you may have technology that does not require minerals the same way we would, and it may come down to how to accomplish tasks with the least energy and effort - and it is much easier to mine an asteroid than mine something in a strong planetary gravity well.

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    $\begingroup$ Just remember that there would be no organic-derived or life-formed deposits. No coal, no oil, no limestone and its derivatives. And that much CO2 plus water ocean will be strongly acidic, which will skew the available dissolved & undissolved minerals. Maybe potential for much richer evaporite deposits where the dissolved minerals get deposited out of the ocean? Possible mineral sediments as solubility of deep water decreases, precipitating mineral rains on the ocean floor? $\endgroup$
    – PcMan
    Commented Aug 26, 2021 at 10:22

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