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Background: theobromine is an alkaloid of the cocoa plant, and is the substance that makes chocolate and chocolate products poisonous to pet cats and dogs.

I'm writing a story in which a character is trapped by a large, rabid animal owned by a supervillain (aka the animal can be anything), but has a large quantity of chocolate on hand, chemistry equipment that they can use to extract theobromine from said chocolate, and an opportunity to contaminate said large, rabid animal's food supply with it.

I'm currently thinking that I should use a tiger or wolf here, given that they're some of the closest animals to modern housepets, but are there any other creatures I could potentially use?

Questions:

What large, threatening (defined as "the odds of a human beating it in hand-to-paw combat are very low") animals can be fatally poisoned by theobromine, and how much theobromine would it take to kill them?

Are tigers and wolves effected by theobromine poisoning, and, if so, how much theobromine is required to kill them?

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This is technically two questions, but let's answer the two

What large, threatening (defined as "the odds of a human beating it in hand-to-paw combat are very low") animals can be fatally poisoned by theobromine?

With scientific evidence? Coyotes. USDA investigated using methylxanthines as toxicants for controlling pest coyotes. Arguably any other large dog or cat can be poisoned by theobromine (or other methylxanthine like caffeine), since their metabolism is similar to their domestic peers.

There is not much of a body of evidence of course, since those animals are not routinely exposed to methylxantines to toxic levels in the wild, and there is no interest in using them as experimental models,

how much theobromine is required to kill them?

LD50 (the dosage required to kill 50% of the population) is 100-200mg of theobromine per kg of body weight. The MSD Veterinary Manual has a calculator with different types of chocolate and the possibility of setting the weight of the animal and how much chocolate they ingested.

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