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The fossorial people are small humanoids. They have hair on their head, but it only grows to around shoulder length. They also have similar hair on their chest, hands, and feet. This hair can resist dirt. Their skeletal characteristics are described here. What clothing would be best at resisting dirt while crawling through or digging dirt-tunnels, while still keeping the wearer warm in an environment akin to medieval Britain?

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    $\begingroup$ What does "resist dirt" mean? Brown clothing? Clothing sprayed with a hydrophobic coating? Why do they habitually crawl through dirt tunnels if they care about resisting dirt? $\endgroup$
    – causative
    Jul 26 at 8:53
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe you are looking for something like mole skin: molepro.com/pages/mole-facts a very dense and fine fur $\endgroup$
    – causative
    Jul 26 at 9:01
  • $\begingroup$ How deep do they dig? Because as you dig deeper, temperatures get warmer and more stable. $\endgroup$
    – Ryan_L
    Jul 26 at 19:21
  • $\begingroup$ note a fossorial species does not need to worry much about warmth, dirt is incredibly thermally stable, thermal variation underground is controlled by depth. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Jul 27 at 5:52
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Why Wear Clothing at All?
Consider normal nudity. If these people evolved to live underground, then they've probably grown accustomed to dirt, insects and the like. Clothing is a matter of culture more than anything else, and seeing as humanoids (bigger ones) have historically gotten along just fine & naked (Tierra del Fuego), there's no obvious reason why these people must wear clothing.

Apart from difficulty in obtaining materials, in the darkness, clothing won't be useful for signalling or decoration (since it's so dark) and anyway, everyone will just misplace their socks.

It's easier to go without!

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    $\begingroup$ Humans have been wearing clothing for a long, long time. The type of clothes you wear is all about culture. Those Yaghans in Tierra del Fuego smeared fish oil and animal fat all over themselves, and constantly kept fires burning (even in wooden canoes!) $\endgroup$
    – RonJohn
    Jul 26 at 22:46
  • $\begingroup$ @RonJohn -- That's exactly what I said! It's all cultural. And in our case, all human cultural. Other sophonts may and probably will behave differently! $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Jul 27 at 0:42
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    $\begingroup$ No, it's not "all cultural". Clothes are damned practical anywhere except the tropics. Heck, even in the tropics, they're needed for light-skinned peoples. $\endgroup$
    – RonJohn
    Jul 27 at 0:47
  • $\begingroup$ @RonJohn -- "Practical" is entirely in the eye of the beholder, and thus more a matter of culture and tradition. $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Jul 27 at 0:49
  • $\begingroup$ You walk in the snow with nothing but the skin you were born in, and -- fish oil and fires or not -- you'll see what a bunch of idiots the Yaghans were. Or the blistering summer sun. Maybe try a forest covered in underbrush. Bottom line: clothes are practical. $\endgroup$
    – RonJohn
    Jul 27 at 1:13
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The only fibers, or fiber like structures, which they can access underground are roots.

The roots of adequate diameter can be dried and woven together to produce a very rough fabric, at most resembling yuta bags, which can offer some protection against contact with the underground. This is what they probably actually need, since a few meters underground temperature is pretty much constant all year long with very small fluctuations when compared to the changes above ground.

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