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The question is: can a solid float on gas? The answer is yes, as is explained pretty well here

But i was wondering if physical conditions (low gravity, very dense gas, pressure...) can exist where a real boat or any kind of boat (to use with a person or a similar weight) can float on a gas.

Supercritical fluids can act in a way similar to a liquid and similar to a gas, with no rigid phase boundary between them. But this occurs at high temperatures and high pressure.

But can a sea made of some high density gas mixture exist? In the sense that it has similarities with clouds (form, dispersion, etc) but in which we can float or at least use a boat to sail it?

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    $\begingroup$ What differences your "boat" from an old fasioned balloon or similar? The sustentation force is always due to the Archimedes'Principle. $\endgroup$ – SJuan76 Jul 14 '15 at 15:09
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If this physics answer is correct then at high enough pressure you can apparently have a gas more dense than water and some solids (solid all the way through, not just boats). You could have a sea of such a gas though it wouldn't have such a clearly defined surface as a liquid. Some solids lighter than water could even float in it.

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A volcano producing an ultra-dense gas, channeled through existing canyons so it stays together.

Sulpher haxafloride is common for demonstrating such "invisible water", and I note that sulfer is associated with volcanoes and flouride comes from minerals...

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