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First of all I've read the other posts and know what the effects of a black hole appearing on the earth's surface is. It goes through the crust, the tectonic plates break apart, volcanos appear everywhere and it moves around inside the earth. In my story a portal is opened up to an area close to a large black hole. Nobody can say the effects of gravity through a portal so I'm just going to treat it as having the strength of a 1mm black hole. It being a portal means the portal can be closed and end the black holes effect so it only lasts lets say 5 seconds. There are also powerful entities in that world that can control the elements enough to keep the tectonic plates from breaking apart and causing volcanoes everywhere. What I want to know is the visual effects on nearby landmasses on a map if a 1mm black hole existed for only 5 seconds, ignoring the effect on the tectonic plates on the rest of the world. Let's say, a distance of 1000-2000 km is what I'm wondering about. Would the land be caving downward because of the black hole? Would they be going in a spiral pattern toward where the black hole is? How much of the oceans water would be drained in that time? Would all the plant life at the distances I provided be destroyed? How far down would the black hole get in the 5 seconds or even in 10 seconds and if it gets to the mantle in that time? Let's say it landed in the Cayman islands, the effect it would have on Cuba and Mexico. Again, this information is so I can figure out how a map would look after the event happened. I don't know how to say this without sounding like I'm ignoring facts, but any effects of the black hole existing for 5 seconds that would destroy the entire earth is probably controlled so it doesn't in this situation. I only want to know how it changes the areas close to it. Lets say the land above is still affected and only the tectonic plates below are held intact.

This is a very important question to me, I'm not giving any of these specifications for no reason. This is not made for the same purpose as the other black hole question, and my last one was closed. I am sorry if this is too hypothetical and it goes against the rules

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  • $\begingroup$ And to add, how much different would it be if it lasted 10 seconds $\endgroup$
    – sociocat
    Apr 19 '21 at 7:59
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    $\begingroup$ Asking the same question a second time because it was closed the first time is a Stack Exchange no-no. Your first question was closed as a duplicate of a previous question. If you believe your first question is not a duplicate, then you must edit that question to explain why it is not, which can lead to it being reopened. $\endgroup$ Apr 19 '21 at 7:59
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    $\begingroup$ If it is still closed it means that either your edits were not sufficient to solve the issue or not enough users casted their votes. In neither case reposting it is going to make any good. $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Apr 19 '21 at 8:05
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    $\begingroup$ Am I just supposed to accept I'm not allowed to have my question answered In short if the community vote to close your question then unless you edit that question (not post a new version as a new question) then you should accept the community decision. That is how SE works and it has happened many, if not all of us, that we were on the wrong side of a community decision. Your question seems too broad to me. Also it can take days for questions to be answered (or reopened) so be more patient - this isn't Twitter. $\endgroup$
    – StephenG
    Apr 19 '21 at 13:06
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    $\begingroup$ However, your writing style is a big wall of text. It makes it very difficult to see any changes. Yes, people could click the "edited X days ago" link and see the changes - but the more hoops someone must jump through to complete the review, the less likely they'll do it in your favor. Break up the text. Use headers, Use asterisk and double-asterisk to italicize text and bold headers. The more you learn to use the site, the easier it'll be to get all this to happen (and the less likely you'll need it). $\endgroup$ Apr 19 '21 at 13:43

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