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Is there an energy substance, element, material, natural or artificial resource with attributes such that: When its moved it loses energy. When its intact, untouched and unmoved it contains energy.

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  • $\begingroup$ Contains or absorbs? $\endgroup$ – user6511 Jul 3 '15 at 0:18
  • $\begingroup$ What is the reference frame implied by "moved"? $\endgroup$ – March Ho Jul 3 '15 at 0:31
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Any object which resists movement will have to do work as it is moved, so it will lose energy.

A very powerful superconducting magnet also loses power due to interactions with the world. If you were to move the magnet, it would need to use up power to adjust the magnetic fields it uses to interact with all metallic objects around it. However, this may not meet your needs because it does lose some energy when sitting put because people may move metallic objects around it. The fancy superconducting magnets for MRIs have to be refreshed periodically due to losses caused by moving metal objects (such as doors being opened and closed)

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I would have to say anything with $PE_{g}$ would meet the when moved it loses energy, and when unmoved it contains energy. This is because something with $PE_{g}$ loses energy when it falls, and contains energy when stationary. This might not be what you are looking for if you wanted an actual power source, but this complies with physics.

EDIT: This does not work when the object moves horizontally, in some possible cases.

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  • $\begingroup$ Interesting, I'll research on that. Im planning to link this attributes to critically acclaimed dark matter. $\endgroup$ – undulationer Jul 2 '15 at 16:01
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    $\begingroup$ But what about when moved up? It gains PE. And when moving at a fixed height maintains its energy. $\endgroup$ – user6511 Jul 2 '15 at 21:19
  • $\begingroup$ @user6511 I was only thinking of vertical movement. So I should add that to the answer. $\endgroup$ – HSchmale Jul 2 '15 at 21:26
  • $\begingroup$ Hmm, didn't I say that in a nearly identical question a short time ago? If this is the same Q with the wording edited, what happened to my notes on potential energy? $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Jul 4 '15 at 5:45
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A contact explosive could be an example of a substance which normally holds energy (as chemical potential energy), but when touched, moved, or accelerated in some way, will release that energy (and therefore lose it) by exploding.

For example, this is a video of nitrogen triiodide exploding when touched with a pole.

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