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I'm new here and know very little about chemistry.

For the sake of a story I'm building, especially with symbolism, I'm having a fire person and a water person coexist in a romance. However, I'm using real world phenomena to help demonstrate it. I'm finding it easy to have water "live with" fire in some ways. Like thermite and other things "burning" underwater, undersea volcanoes, and hydrothermal vents. I also found this thread: What metal would burn steadily in a water lamp? Thanks to the addition of calcium carbide, a fire could technically be on top of water, as a reverse. But I'm not sure how long the two would last together. I'm finding it very hard-pressed to find other equivalents for water on a larger scale. The closest I found was a "lake" in the Halema'uma'u crater of Hawaii's Kīlauea volcano, but it wasn't exactly active (and technically not water). There's the other obvious combinations resulting in steam and the creation of cooled rock for islands, but they're over with almost instantly. I was wondering if there were other possible ones I may have missed. Like, is there any other physical ways for water to be next to fire without the two cancelling out?

Plus: How viable is the following? A scene I wanted to try involved a pool of water and waterfalls in a volcanic rock cave or cavern area with fire on top, yet not extinguishing. I figured maybe an additive of some sort could act as fuel for the fire and keep it perpetually going. Could a cycle involving evaporation help? If not full on waterfalls, maybe a sort of "rain"?

If something's not clear, please let me know.

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Fire and water are not as incompatible as your might think.

In your tap.Youtube video. enter image description here

An australian river set on fire. Cnn video. enter image description here

Or even Fire under Water enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ @Thunderhammer This is a good answer, but maybe needs a little discussion. Flammable gasses can go through water unignited, and burn on the surface separate from the water. So I see a beautiful metaphor for romance, as the fuel of love comes forth from water, powering the flames of desire. Look at any fire-water feature available for sale to go in your back yard. The water helps make the flames safe, again a beautiful metaphor for love... $\endgroup$ – DWKraus Mar 8 at 15:56
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Water vapor is still water, though in a gaseous phase. And, literally speaking, romance can end up in something hot and steamy.

As long as the temperature is below a few thousands degrees, water won't dissociate

At the very high temperature of 3000 °C more than half of the water molecules are decomposed, but at ambient temperatures only one molecule in 100 trillion dissociates by the effect of heat

and if you increase pressure, you can still keep liquid water at temperatures above 100 Celsius: the critical point of water is at 22 MPa and 647 K.

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  • $\begingroup$ "...something hot and steamy." --- Should this be tagged [sex]? ;))) $\endgroup$ – elemtilas Mar 8 at 8:56
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why not use lithium or sodium? those can burn water (albeit more like exploding) the excess hydrogen then rises, reacts with some chemical containing oxygen, makes more water, which then precipitates back down. as long as you can find a way to break down the LiOH into lithium and monohydrogen monoxide, then reacting with the hydrogen again, then you have a sort of exploding water cycle based around lithium. this reaction all together should make it appear as if they water is burning.

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Love triangle.

Somehow this idea has lodged in my mind

The fire: destroys everything by burning, but fire produces two new things. Lifeless carbon dioxide... and water. Fire makes water. The fire is an agent of destruction and might be seen as evil, but out of the destruction comes empowerment for water.

The green: creates new life out of what is not alive but in the process, destroys water. Water is consumed to make green life. Green life might be seen as good, but life requires the destruction of water, which in making life ceases to exist as water.

I do not think this story can have water choosing the one or the other. Fire and the Green hate each other, but water must move between them for the cycle to continue.

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  • $\begingroup$ I actually did consider a love triangle, but not like this. Interesting! $\endgroup$ – Thunderhammer Mar 10 at 2:39

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