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The world that I'm making draws strong influence from a multitude of religions, mythology, and folklore, and that extends to the planes from occult beliefs. These planes are the Physical Plane, Astral Plane, Mental Plane, Soulful Plane, Spiritual Plane, Divine Plane, and Logoic Plane.

In my setting exist an infinite number of demiplanes, which are categorized into one of the seven types of the aforementioned planes. Demiplanes that have physics and traits comparable to that of the universe as we know it are part of the Physical Plane (I'm debating making demiplanes of the Physical Plane just planets located somewhere in the universe), demiplanes accessed through hallucinogens are part of the Mental or Spiritual Plane (depending on the substance), the Astral Plane has many demiplanes where the astral body goes depending on one's beliefs, etc.

While categorizing demiplanes makes things easier to understand for readers, roleplayers, and writers, it also is a gross simplification of the complex subject of religious beliefs and the afterlife. I've heard that one thing skilled worldbuilders do is to leave some stones left unturned, as in not explain every little detail and let others make their own headcanons to fill in the gaps.

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    $\begingroup$ Oo, somebody else is reading theosophy! $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Feb 26, 2021 at 13:39
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    $\begingroup$ Depends on your audience. $\endgroup$ Feb 27, 2021 at 15:34

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A lot depends on the genre and type of work. A short story does not need as many details as a multi-volume saga. I also believe that the number of details of a world is a matter of preference. Some authors and readers need to know the thread count of fabrics used by minor characters while others do not care much even about major things like climate and world geography.

I think that you should not worry too much about planes per se. Build your universe however it pleases you. However, do not flood readers with too much exposition. Bring your planes and their descriptions when necessary and do not make it into a long and boring lecture.

Also, whatever makes into your manuscript/game/etc. should serve some purpose. If your characters are not going to visit the multitude of planes there is no need to mention them at all.

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You have probably read a lot of material on RPG and planes. I suggest you read those again with a more critical eye this time.

Dungeons and Dragons was created by a trio of nerdy teenagers trapped in adult bodies, then expanded by more nerdy guys. Their elemental planes are a play with the classical elements. When they added the positive and negative planes it was still kinda ok but from then on it got silly.

Does that make the planes of D&D suck? No. As a nerdy teenager trapped in an adult body, I love D&D and I will defend it with my life.

Now grab yourself some absinthe and have a look at White Wolf's planes of existence. Start with Werewolf: the Apocalypse and make it all the way to Wraith: the Oblivion. You will be impressed, then depressed (in a positive, constructive way), then much more inspired.

Don't like the fantasy setting of D&D? Not enough emo to read White Wolf? If you wish to go hard sci-fi, read The Universe in a Nutshell by Stephen Hawking. See what he has to say about p-branes. Also notice that his is not a work of fiction!

Wanna go superhero? The MCU has already shown ita multiverse, and some places are planes of existence of their own (such as the mirror and the dark dimensions, the quantum realm and the insides of the soul stone).

Each setting has its own quirks and levels of maturity, exposition and reference to mythology. Each caters to a particular audience, not caring if haters gonna hate. I suggest you take a page from those and write your own universe with your specific audience in mind, so that you can rest easy about whether it is appropriate.

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