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With the 11 Olympian gods along with many of the demigods annihilated and Olympus set on fire, Aphrodite and her worshippers quickly retreated into hiding. There is a prophecy that only love can save the world from evil and the evildoers such as the rival gods who are still residing at Mt Othrys.

My question is this: how can the prophecy be accurate? I doubt Aphrodite can seduce every being on Mt Othrys with her charms alone so how can the divine vision still hold? Unlike the 12 gods, the Titans do not gain strength from worship since they are born from the chaos that spills out of the hot universe.

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  • $\begingroup$ Technically, Aphodite is a Titan too. Born of Oranos and Gaea after Cronus dismembered the former and threw his penis into the sea. Only the male Titans were imprisoned in Tartarus, the female ones were quite welcome in Olympus, and Zeus' bed, including Rhea, his mother. Make of that what you will $\endgroup$
    – nzaman
    Feb 25, 2021 at 5:17
  • $\begingroup$ Aphrodite was an active instigator and participant in the Trojan War. (She even participated directly in battle, and engineered the death of Achilles, which, as we all know, "brought countless woes upon the Achaeans". $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Feb 25, 2021 at 8:47
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexP: She was also ordered by Zeus to make Pandora exceptionally beautiful so that she would be "an evil men will love to embrace". In addition, prior to her marriage, she caused many of the unwed male gods to get into a heated fight over which one of them she should marry and she was very unhelpful in the selection. Ultimately either Hera or Zues, pointed out that Haephestus (who was uninterested) was unwed and worked late hours in the forge (the implication being that he would not be around to make sure his wife was faithful). $\endgroup$
    – hszmv
    Feb 25, 2021 at 18:05
  • $\begingroup$ One thing that's unclear is what counts as success for "save the world" Is this a full blown war where the Titans have to be dead at the end of it? Is just stripping them of their influence in the mortal realm outside Mt. Othrys enough? $\endgroup$ Feb 25, 2021 at 19:04

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Aristophanes has already answered this in his Lysistrata

Lysistrata (/laɪˈsɪstrətə/ or /ˌlɪsəˈstrɑːtə/; Attic Greek: Λυσιστράτη, Lysistrátē, "Army Disbander") is an ancient Greek comedy by Aristophanes, originally performed in classical Athens in 411 BC. It is a comic account of a woman's extraordinary mission to end the Peloponnesian War between Greek city states by denying all the men of the land any sex, which was the only thing they truly and deeply desired. Lysistrata persuades the women of the warring cities to withhold sexual privileges from their husbands and lovers as a means of forcing the men to negotiate peace—a strategy, however, that inflames the battle between the sexes.

With support from the Spartan Lampito, Lysistrata persuades the other women to withhold sexual privileges from their menfolk as a means of forcing them to conclude the Peloponnesian War. The women are very reluctant, but the deal is sealed with a solemn oath around a wine bowl, Lysistrata choosing the words and Calonice repeating them on behalf of the other women. It is a long and detailed oath, in which the women abjure all their sexual pleasures, including the Lioness on the Cheese Grater (a sexual position)

Who else if not the goddess of love is better suited for plotting this maneuver?

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  • $\begingroup$ I seriously want to know what the hell the lioness on the cheese grater looks like. Sounds . . . well I don’t even know. $\endgroup$ Feb 25, 2021 at 5:22
  • $\begingroup$ @gen-ℤreadytoperish, I guess it has probably something to do with the woman staying above, if I think of this grater imgix.bustle.com/uploads/image/2018/9/14/… $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Feb 25, 2021 at 5:54
  • $\begingroup$ Yup I see it now 😳 $\endgroup$ Feb 25, 2021 at 6:59
  • $\begingroup$ +1 for Lysistata. It is a great comedy (available online from many sources, for example at Perseus, and various adaptations are still performed today), two and a half millennia after it was written. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Feb 25, 2021 at 8:55
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Let's look at Aphrodite's domains. From Wikipedia: "Aphrodite is an ancient Greek goddess associated with love, beauty, pleasure, passion and procreation." We can fudge things a bit and consider control over those domains to also include control over their opposites: hatred, revulsion, pain, indifference, infertility. Let's also assume that she can bestow some measure of her powers on her followers, as deities are known to do. So Aphrodite isn't a combatant herself but both plays a game of psychological warfare from the shadows and boosts the cohesion and esprit de corps of her troops to unimaginable heights.

  • Love / hatred: These can be used to reinforce the morale and cohesion of her supporters and fighting forces and sow dissension among her opponents. Don't underestimate the love aspect; Napoleon once wrote “In war, moral power is to physical as three parts out of four.” and we've all heard tales of people achieving the impossible because of their willpower and devotion to a cause or their comrades. A tightly-knit group of the remaining demi-gods, spirits, and legendary human heroes motivated to do their utmost by their love of Aphrodite, for their bonds with each other, for their love of a peaceful world, can take down even Titans, so love indeed ultimately saves the world as the prophecy foretold. The flipside is hatred and if Aphrodite is able to get the opposing Titans to distrust each other or even fight among themselves, the war is half won already.
  • Beauty / revulsion: Beauty can be used to lure the undecided away from the ranks of her opponents, aid in gathering information and intelligence (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honey_trapping). One also might consider using beauty offensively by enhancing the attractiveness of important personages in the enemy camp in such a way to cause jealousy or strife.
  • Pleasure / pain: Pleasure can be used to reinforce the morale of her supporters. Pain has its uses as a mechanism for coercion of opponents and also for disrupting combat effectiveness of opposing forces on the battlefield. One might also consider addiction to excessive pleasure as a way of corrupting or distracting opponents.
  • Passion / indifference: Passion here refers to devotion to a cause rather than romantic passion. Usage is similar to love / hatred so I won't repeat it.
  • Procreation / infertility: Procreation doesn't necessarily need to be limited to deities/humans. Think "plague of locusts" but crank it up a thousand-fold; enough of that sort of thing will slow down even a Titan.
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Heroes

What makes a hero venture forth to slay the dragon, or in this case put the Titans back in their cage?

Love.

Be it love of a family, love of a special someone, love of a child, or love for the world.

What can Aphrodite do? Find those whose love is powerful enough to see them through the dark road to earn the power, learn the power, and then wield the power to confront the Titans.

The Opposite of Chaos is?

Cooperation and collaboration. The antithesis of the Titans.

What makes it possible to maintain Cooperation and Collaboration when the world around you is being torn apart? Love.

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The keys to her success are not from her strengths and powers, but from the weaknesses of the gods she opposes. The Rival Gods get their power from the worship of lesser beings. All she has to do is divert the faith of those lesser beings away from the Rival Gods by giving them someone new to worship.

She could use her procreative powers to create something new, a child imbued with great beauty. Then hand over to him dominion over Charitable Love. She might then deliver the child into the hands of those lesser beings, allowing him to grow up in direct contact with the Rival God worshippers. In such close contact, his beauty and his love-inspired teachings would have a strong impact on those people.

Hiding nearby, she could arrange for miracles and healings to enrich her child's legend (either through her own divine powers or through favors from the other surviving demigods) and later in his life, she might even arrange for his dramatic death through crucifixion.

In the aftermath of that tragic event, a new religion might come into to the world, one which would slowly but consistently lure the faithful away from the rival gods. In a few centuries at most, the rival gods would be un-worshipped, and therefore un-powered. Soon after that, they would be forgotten. Victory through attrition is still victory.

I'm not saying that that is what really happened, but you never know... women are tricky that way.

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Seduction/passion : she can use this to bring enemy gods and heroes to her side.

Fertility: she is immortal and can restart the Pantheon by breeding new gods and demigods.

Given a couple centuries she comes out of hiding with new army and allies to take down the titans.

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