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To those who does not know what transcendence traveling is, it is when you move from one plane to another to move a distance across that plane just to pop in to your own again.

To free your self of the constrains of the real world to make the travel.

Imagine a triangle, you start at one corner to move towards another corner, you have 2 paths you can move, either down or across, If you move across it takes you 2000 years to move, but if you move down the way across it gets shorter. making the distance traveled a lot shorter.

Trancendance Travel

In most stories, the path traveled is often associated with the nether regions, hell, or some other terrible place.

In Event Horizon the ship goes through a terrible place that affects the peoples mind. And in games like Warhammer 40k the warp is a place of chaos, that can contaminate people even if shielded.

The question

Is there any documented, either religion based, scientific or theoretic description of what would happen if you goes below sub-space plane to a deeper plane. In an attempt to make the travels even shorter as a shortcut (or to travel greater distances).

Or would it mathematically be so close to the point that there in theory would be no space left?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Erik, bowlturner, Philipp, Tim B Jun 27 '15 at 21:08

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Since the entire concept is fictional, are you looking for examples from inside specific stories, or just general possible theories? $\endgroup$ – Erik Jun 24 '15 at 12:48
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    $\begingroup$ Well that was a hard question, in theory i'm looking for any idea - but that would make this question about idea generation and that is against world buildings rules, $\endgroup$ – Magic-Mouse Jun 24 '15 at 13:11
  • $\begingroup$ To whom ever voted to close this: can you inform what is unclear so i can try and explain it - rather than just vote to close? $\endgroup$ – Magic-Mouse Jun 24 '15 at 13:12
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    $\begingroup$ @Magic-Mouse (Not an answer, but) As you go further 'down' the 'triangle' towards the lowest 'point', your travel time/distance decreases so velocity increases. I imagine that at the final lowest point, the speed would be ~infinite and you would be everywhere in the universe... simultaneously. Wait, I think Scotty said that.... $\endgroup$ – Amziraro Jun 24 '15 at 14:31
  • $\begingroup$ By asking about any documented, either religion based, scientific or theoretic description, you are making this question far too broad. This kind of "sub-space" is a very common trope in SciFi and there are countless examples of how to handle this. In the end it boils down to "whatever fits your story". $\endgroup$ – Philipp Jun 24 '15 at 14:37
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The concept of levels of hyperspace (the generalized term for other spatial or pseudo-spatial dimensions) has been extensively explored in the SF genre, so you might get better ideas in that exchange.

Certainly there have been fictional universes where there are ascending "spaces" with corresponding energies and varying distance equivalents in this space. In these stories, a more powerful ship can penetrate farther into the space manifold to reach levels which permit shorter overall transit times. At the very least, you can try David Drake's Daniel Leary/RCN series.

And no discussion of the subject can pass up the possible alternative - that our universe has the highest effective velocity. From https://scifi.stackexchange.com/questions/84453/scientist-discovers-hyperspace-with-a-twist which describes George R.R. Martin's "FTA", with the final sentences,

But Lopez gave us a hyperdrive thirty years ago. That’s when we discovered that the limiting velocity in hyperspace is not the speed of light. It’s slower, Kinery. It’s slower.

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