9
$\begingroup$

Background

What are blademancers?

Blademancers are mages (going by the definition "Anyone who uses magic", and not "old man who wears a pointy hat and carries a staff") who can control blades from a distance.

Note: Henceforth I will be using 'sword' and 'hilt' and other such terms, because I am using sword as a default weapon here. Thus when I talk about a 'sword', I mean whatever weapon the blademancer is using.

A blademancer is able to control only those swords that have a specific magical seal/mechanism built into their hilt. Once they have such a sword, they can take control of it. For this, they first reach out and 'feel' (psychically) the blade, then 'take hold' of it. After that they can move the sword as if a disembodied hand was grasping and moving it.

Limits

Number: A blademancer can, depending on their level of mastery, control 2-8 blades at a time. Only the weakest of the weak blademancer struggles to move past one, and the average blademancer (not that 'average' and 'weak' is comparable to blademancers. You have to be extremely skilled to even become one) can, in his/her lifetime, attain 6-7 and sometimes 8. Gifted humans, demigods, gods and other such powerful entities can attain even more, but are so extremely improbable as to not factor into worldbuilding at all. They can take control of them at once, and do not need to repeat the 'taking control' procedure for each sword. if a sword breaks, they can take control of a previously uncontrolled sword without letting go of other swords, but that will take time and concentration and may be very hard to do when in an active fight. Number affects mental stamina.

Weight: Each sword in the above given limit is around 1 - 1.2 Kg (2.2 - 2.6 lb). The heavier the sword, the more the effort needed to control it. Weight affects both physical and mental stamina.

Distance: Most blademancers can control swords to a maximum of 3-5 metres away. This is distance from the blademancer to the magical seal, so the weapon can have parts of it outside the limit. Distance does not affect stamina perceivably. Holding a sword 5 metres away is not significantly more difficult than holding it a metre away, though for a very long duration, it can start to affect physical stamina.

Point to note: The weight affects the limit pretty linearly - An 8-mancer holding 4 2Kg swords will feel the same strain, and if he/she holds 8 such swords he/she will get tired twice as fast.

However, the number limit is absolute. A 7-mancer is unable to fight properly with 8 swords not because he/she gets tired more quickly, either physically or mentally, but because of an inability to focus. Using 8 swords will not make one sword weaker, it will mean being bad with all swords being used, or only using some swords at a time while not moving the rest. This is the same as a beginner piano player who can't play with both hands at the same time and upon trying makes a cacophonic mess with both hands.

Thus, using 500 gram swords will not make an 8-mancer be able to use 16 swords. However, an 8-mancer will be able to hold them at the same level of physical strain, and can do things like chucking a few at the enemy while finely using the rest.

Additional limits: Humans are bad at multitasking. It is extremely mentally straining for a blademancer to fight multiple targets not close to each other at the same time with a high level of skill. They are also pretty bad at fighting what they can't see so no fighting behind their back. They can move swords behind them, and doing something like having a sword circle you is easy even when it goes behind their back, but they can't fight someone behind them any better than just slashing in the general vicinity and other reflex actions.

The Question

What weapon does it make the most sense to fight with, for a blademancer? Only weapons with one/limited components are allowed, as each component and moving part requires a seal on it. A bow will require a seal on the bow, and the arrow, and so on.

Edits/ Additional Information

Will be updated as requested

E1: Due to the fact that every weapon needs to have a magical mechanism built into it, the weapons do have a minimum weight. Assume 400-500 grams. Magical mechanisms are tedious and expensive to produce, and sometimes some cults or organisations (not necessarily blademancers, but applies to them too) keep it secret how to make them. So a group of blademancers using cutting edge (hehe) magical seals would make damn sure not to leave any of their weapons just lying around, though this is less of a consideration than the time and effort needed ot produce the blade.

E2: The magical seal/mechanism is an actual physical thing, like a carving or a rune, made of its own material. It is not some metaphysical thing or enchantment upon the blade that is there but not in the physical world. It is very much in the physical world.

$\endgroup$
12
  • 13
    $\begingroup$ Just to nitpick... the "-mancy" suffix come from the greek "manteia" meaning divination or prophecy. A blademancer would thereforce be someone who can tell the future by looking at sharp objects (and in this case, your future will probably be brief and uncomfortable). $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 16:22
  • $\begingroup$ Eh, it's a working name. I don't plan to call them that in the story, just to get across my point right now $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 16:25
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ @StarfishPrime I fully agree with you but blame popular culture for that. A pyromancer is apparently somebody who controls fire, while a necromancer is apparently somebody who controls undead. Where both should really be glorified seers on par with card readers. $\endgroup$
    – VLAZ
    Feb 9 at 16:29
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Mass doesn't make it entirely clear - what are the minimum dimensions of this seal? Is it just required that the weapon be a certain quantity of metal, or does it need to have a space the size of (for example) an American quarter on the hilt? $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Feb 9 at 16:54
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ How is this not a character question? One individual may prefer to wield one-inch knives because they like to finesse their kill, while another just wants it over with and uses a headsman's axe, and a third thinks it's just fun to use both at once. $\endgroup$
    – Frostfyre
    Feb 9 at 20:56

11 Answers 11

19
$\begingroup$

The smallest, sharpest blades they can afford.

Take a Lesson from Yondu

For a normal swordperson, a sword has to fulfill multiple roles. It can be a bludgeoning weapon against a person with heavy armour. It can be a protection against a similarly armed enemy. It can stab, it can cut.

But they have to hold it, and get within sword-length of someone else.

Your Blademancers don't have to worry about anatomical impossibility, nor the normal laws of leverage. So needle-thin, razor-sharp daggers with the smallest hilts possible mean that they can kill practically anyone. The blade can be behind an opponent, driven up under the gorget and into the spine with all the force of a sword thrust and none of the armour resistance. They can be driven through eye holes in a helmet, into joints in the limbs. The grip on the hilt isn't affected by the slipperiness of blood or the binding of armour, so it can be yanked back out to stab again, and again, and again.

All the force and leverage that a normal swordsperson needs a nice, big hilt to get their fingers around can be delivered in something that their opponents can barely see, let alone defend against.

$\endgroup$
12
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Yep, this is exactly the answer I was about to give. I'd add to this by including a single sword driven through a shield, so you can have a mobile ranged defensive element too... useful in a duel between stabby wizards. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 16:20
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @John - that's why, as detailed in my answer, you don't stab them in the armoured bits. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Feb 9 at 18:05
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @John I understood the point to be that this approach is much more nimble. $\endgroup$ Feb 10 at 1:16
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Michael - The OP has established that there is a minimum mass (about 400g) and the technology involved is medieval, possibly pre-steel! So I'm not talking about a hypodermic needle when I say "as small and sharp as possible". The constraints mean that we're looking at something more like a painstakingly sharp knitting needle, if that. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Feb 10 at 16:48
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @DoktorJ - There are a lot of assumptions there. The blademaster is not constrained by vertical displacement or having sharp bits of metal where the wielder's body would be located, so angles of approach are going to be unconventional, and as fast (or faster) than a trained swordsman can stab. Bringing four feet of metal around to parry it (or worse, two such blades) is not going to be trivial. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Feb 10 at 16:51
9
$\begingroup$

Don't bring a blade to a throwing knife fight

Stop me if I'm wrong, but you don't seem to forbid the use of throwing weapons. I would therefore be inclined to have your blademancer primarily use throwing daggers. Give it as much momentum as you can while it's in your range of motion and let it go.

There is also the added benefit that even a "bad" blademancer who can only juggle a few weapons at a time will still be able to throw a hell of a knife, and the fact that you can carry many more spare daggers than swords.

If you still want a melee option

Maybe keep a simple Roman gladius by your side, as a way to defend yourself from nearby assailants, as it is fairly short and not too heavy (a 60 cm blade for about 1kg). That should make it relatively easy for your blademancer to manipulate while still throwing dagger after dagger. As gladii are quite easy to handle swords, they can be a good way to find weaknesses in enemy armor.

Let's pike it up

My answer might not meet the requirement of the question after the edit, so let me propose something else: a pike! Basically extremely long spears, the Macedonians made great use of them. Some pikes could be as much as six metres long! They would be rather heavy if you went to that extreme, but even if you have a third of that you can have quite an impressive range, keeping the enemy at bay. You could easily have a one man phalanx that is nigh impossible for an adversary to approach!

I would still advise your blademancer to keep the above-mentioned gladius, as a last resort weapon.

$\endgroup$
5
  • $\begingroup$ I did my best with the edit, but I'm not sure "maniable" meant "manageable". The last sentence doesn't really make sense, so if you have a better idea of what you were trying to say, please correct me. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Feb 9 at 16:36
  • $\begingroup$ @jdunlop thanks for the edit. i rephrased that and hope it got better. $\endgroup$
    – shas
    Feb 9 at 16:46
  • $\begingroup$ Well, you made the plural worse - the plural of "gladius" is "gladii" (in the Roman tradition). $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Feb 9 at 17:00
  • $\begingroup$ The pike is an interesting idea. Especially from a defending position, or in the midst of a larger attacking force, you could have a stockpile of "sealed" pikes at hand and use all your strength to lob just one at a time, and make them nice and hefty. Of course this brings up an interesting point: what if the enemy force has a blademancer too? Can they catch incoming weapons as soon as the seal comes in range, and possibly block or at least slow it? *Imagines an insane duel between two blademancers, consisting entirely of them hurling one single pike back and forth at each other all day* $\endgroup$
    – Doktor J
    Feb 10 at 15:24
  • $\begingroup$ This may be the one case where throwing knives are actually the answer. $\endgroup$
    – Harabeck
    Feb 10 at 23:05
6
$\begingroup$

don't use one type of weapon use them all.

The less diverse your weapons the less diverse your options and the easier it is to counter you.

Axes or maces for power, shields for protection, swords or spears for precision and control.

Use couple of shields to cover your back and defend from ranged attacks, you have a lot of space you are trying to cover. On the plus side a shield should not require much focus. Getting stabbed from behind kills a lot more people than anything else. luckily leaving out handles will reduce the weight of your shields significantly, so with a single piece of bass or steel for ease of enchanting. you are not swinging a shield so weight may be less of an issue. 3-5 meters is a LOT of space, most will not be using them at this distance, out in the open 8 weapons may not be enough to cover all that. they need to be fighting multiple opponents at the same time, if they try to focus on one they die because all the other enemies rush them. So cocky blademancers to try to fight at full distance or bring many weapons to bear on one opponent don't live long

I would suggest one weapon per shield and vice versa depending on the size of your shields up tp about 3 shields. Of course if your blademancers can wear armor and carry a shield you needs fewer floating shields.

Consider having extra weapons so you can switch out depending on what you expect to fight. Use swords or short spears for light infantry or enclosed spaces. have few axes, hammer, billhook, or Halbert for dealing with armored opponents. A properly made axe or mace is not heavier than a sword.

Personally I would build a metal bracket that can be enchanted then fit a normal and thus disposable shield or weapon to it, but you make your rules. A good but light wooden shield has many parts and does not weight much. Metal ones either have to be smaller or heavier. of course you could go with simple wooden planks as shields it will just mean replacing them often.

$\endgroup$
5
$\begingroup$

Ninja stars

Small 3-or-4-pointed stars, 10-20cm in dimeter. No more heavier than needs to be to penetrate flesh (200g should be plenty)

enter image description here

Just walk up to an enemy army with them flying from jugular to jugular, or eye to eye.

If anyone is wearing plate armour, rotate the blade it such that it fits into the seams - Achilles tendon seeking blades essentially. Pre-perspex helmets had a slit for vision - since you can manoeuvre the star precisely you can line it up with the slit. Since they're light and manouverable when confronted with a full chainmail outfit you can use one star to lift and another to slice.

These are easier for the mental-component than a sword or even a throwing dagger - as in the unarmoured case, with the transfer of the blade from dying enemy 1 to enemy 2 you do not need to rotate the blade 180 degrees to target that next enemy - Just accelerate towards the next jugular, there's already a blade facing the right way.

Also, the wealthy blademancer can stockpile them. You can launch a few using your magic outside of the 5m range by accelerating them across the threshold - they are meant to fly like a frisbee. They may hit at a distance, or they may not. You can walk up near them later to re-use them. You can fit 50 in a backpack that you can carry into battle and spam the enemy army 8-at-a-time at face / jugular level.

But these are also good for the frugal blademancer - These are re-usable . If a level 1 can only use one at a time and can only afford one he can still do the cool walk through an enemy army with the single magic ninja star 3-5m in front of him bouncing from soldiers neck to neck.


I'm uncertain of what the minimum tech needed to stop these (without shooting the blademancer) actually would be. Any exposed skin and your a gonner. Any seams and your a gonner, any armour that is multi part and you're a gonner because they can lift parts away. Modern swat teams and riot police dont have armour on the back of their shins or buttocks - nor do modern infantry, and big arteries run right through there.

Two stars back to back counter rotating will function as scissors, which I know from experience can cut modern kevlar fabrics quite efficiently, so 3 working in tandem could quickly penetrate a full bullet proof suit like that used by riot modern swat police even if it was extended to cover every part entirely.

$\endgroup$
6
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Great idea but economically difficult. Each ninja star would have to have the magical mechanism built onto it, which would mean it has to be bigger (but not much), but more importantly, it needs a great deal more production time and money paid for it. I can see rich noblemen equipping their loyal blademancers with them, but the typical blademancer would need something reusable. Also throwing them away would mean giving up a valuable item to an enemy. So one would need to make sure to get each one you threw at your enemy. Also maybe 50 is too many, but yeah they can carry a lot of these. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 16:25
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @RibhuHooja These are re-usable and compatible with the frugal blademancer. If a level 1 can only use one at a time and can only afford one he can still do the cool walk through an enemy army with the single magic ninja star 3m in front of him bouncing from soldiers neck to neck. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    Feb 9 at 17:01
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Anyone wearing good armor can just walk thought them and stab you. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Feb 9 at 17:56
  • $\begingroup$ @John how good? A single peice modern kevlar full body suit that you're sewn into? sure. But that's a bit future tech (and I can cut kevlar with scissors so suspect two counter rotating blades could get through even that). Plate armour has seams for manouveraility that you can get into as discussed, so youre really only left with chainmail. But one blade can lift chainmail enough to create a seam while another slices. Without perspex helmets had slits for vision, these thin knives could take out the eyes. If the enemy is in armour you have the focus to slaughter them, that's all. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    Feb 10 at 3:04
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @ John I'm litterally dating a larp-er who has made her own chainmail for reenactment fights by hand. There is chainmail on the dining room table right now. $\endgroup$
    – Ash
    Feb 10 at 4:09
3
$\begingroup$
  • It depends on the style of 'blademancy school' they studied.:

Ranged Attacks. (For assassination of distant targets).

These could be stunningly accurate over vast distances. A dart which can be accelerated within the area of control (5 meters ish) could achieve astonishing speed, the accuracy comes from the degree of control. (Think, the longer the rifle and the 'steadier the hand' - the better the marksman). Darts for armor-penetration,

Melee.

Finesse: This can be achieved with a daggers (or a few), or a foil-like weapon (Fencing wiki)

More robustly: Opponents can be fought or disarmed with a two-ended bludgeon type weapon.

More reach: This can be achieved with a staff with a spear-end and maybe a club, rake or scythe at the other.

The gentle way: Primarily defensive, can be achieved with a shield or buckler-type weapon, using it to disarm, trip or 'gently' knock-out the opponent. Also blocking ranged attacks.

Cat's cradle: Another gentle way is the lasso, using it to whip round opponent's limbs, trip them, or hold them still. (Possibly sending them spinning upon release).

  • The ability of blademancers to not only master more than a single weapon at a time, but any additional fighting styles, would be viewed with great respect.
$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

Needles

enter image description here

Eight poisoned needles can find holes in armor, eye slits in helmets. Chain mail would be no protection at all. They'd be almost impossible to block, hard to see and easy to hide. Also being so light, they'd be almost no strain to control.

Even if not poisoned, needles going through someone's eye slits if going to mess their day up.

Perfect assassin weapon.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Poison needs a long time to work. OP stated a maximum range of 5m, so an assassin would need to get very close. Needles would cause relatively little damage. Chain mail is often worn over or under a gambeson which would probably protect from needles. So eyes are really your only viable target. $\endgroup$
    – Michael
    Feb 10 at 9:14
2
$\begingroup$

Frame Challenge: Biological Weaponry

Why would blademancers focus on using blades? As per the OP: "Blademancers are mages (going by the definition "Anyone who uses magic", and not "old man who wears a pointy hat and carries a staff") who can control blades from a distance.

Note: Henceforth I will be using 'sword' and 'hilt' and other such terms, because I am using sword as a default weapon here. Thus when I talk about a 'sword', I mean whatever weapon the blademancer is using."

So, first we have a specific term-"blades" then a vague term-"weapons." Assuming a blademancer can control any weapon with the special seal and/or mechanism on it, then blademancers can be something more lethal, something more dangerous than those simple mages flying blades around willy-nilly: puppetmasters.

Seriously, what is a person trained in martial arts? A living weapon-by honing their skills through training, they have turned their body into a weapon. Put a seal on such an individual, and one would have a formidable weapon, since "Point to note: The weight affects the limit pretty linearly - An 8-mancer holding 4 2Kg swords will feel the same strain, and if he/she holds 8 such swords he/she will get tired twice as fast."

Weight is essentially a non-issue, so a blademancer can lift their puppets, fly them around, set them down, and magically enhance the force of their strikes. Granted, controlling a whole person should be quite a mental strain, and will likely require the puppeteer to move with their puppet, sort of like the puppet is reflecting the puppeteer's motions.

"Oh, but wouldn't that require lots of seals, one on every human joint?" Yes, but tattooing has been around since at least Egyptian times (tattoos were found on mummified skin) and putting tattoos all over someone's body has been done before, many, many times. It'd likely be even less cost-extensive to simply tattoo someone than engrave a seal in solid steel, however it'd likely be harder to control one over the other.

That all being said, all of this falls to pieces if blademancers can only control blades. But not quite. Why? Two words: screws and skeletons. If needles are a viable weapon for a blademancer, why not screws with a seal on the head, holding a skeleton together?

Logically, even though the OP said one can only have 1-8 blades, a screw is so small that one could argue that it doesn't even count as a full blade, only 1/16th of a blade, so a really good blademancer (probably female, women seem to have a natural ease of multitasking) could field an entire squad of skeleton soldiers!

If not, since one can control swords and spears, then it would seem only one part of a weapon has to be a blade. Logically then, one can control one skeleton and the screws inside it, allowing one to lift and move (even fly) a skeleton around. Even taking the limited distance in the OP into account (which would require the blademancer to be relatively close to the skeleton), a skeleton would be a formidable opponent to defeat, since it lacks vital organs and can wield weapons itself (swords, crossbows, etc.)

Another option would be to stamp seals into specially made (and blade-shaped) plates of armor and control those, allowing one to move plates of armor around to deflect attacks, trap weapons before they can hit you, or even detach and fly around the wearer to shred surrounding enemies. This would require either a way to drastically boost the number of blades one can control at a time or a group of blademancers working together, which is unlikely to work.

A metal version of a wooden-snake toy, with a razor-sharp edge on the front and top and a flat underside, could also be a formidable weapon. After coiling around a person's shoulders, it could pull them up (or forward) and cut off blood flow to the arms, and two of these "serpent-swords" could force together one's wrists and/or ankles and then bind them together.

Blades could be affixed in similar ways to make other weapons for the eccentric (or stealth-loving) blademancer: cockroaches, pidgeons, fish...the list goes on and on. Keep in mind that these "aniblades" can be disguised (except for the pointy bits of course).

A dancer's jewelry could also be weaponry; even if she's not being puppeteered, a willing dancer could sneak (or be invited) into an enemy camp. A belt with connected blades serving as a skirt could tie up opponents (and the attached blades may be built to fly off and cause chaos or stay attached and rend people as the belt flies around), segmented bracelets or anklets, a belly chain, a razor-sharp piercing or two.....

As a final note, shields with edges could be a valuable tool for blademancers, serving as both protection and a weapon, and crossbow bolts or arrows (being basically spears) could be controlled by blademancers to ensure the accuracy of allied archers.

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

The primary weapon I would choose would be a bunch of 500 gram double-sided metal darts. These can be propelled at others for ranged combat, can circle you at your maximum range for stopping others from entering it, and can also be used for closer combat. You should also have a large shield that normally protects your back but can be moved to wield off particular dangers. You should also ideally have a spare "slot" or "hand" or whatever so you can "catch" another blademancers blade if it is propelled at you.

if you could weild 8 blades at once you would organise them like this:

1 sheild 1 attacking dart (for ranged combat) 1 empty hand/slot/space 5 darts rotating around you 5 metres away from you at the highest possible velocity

you would likely carry a few other darts on your person for when/if you make a ranged attack with your primary attacking dart. If you could weild less things you would just decrease the radius of the circling darts and have less of them. If you can only weild two blades I would choose to have one sheild and 1 dart that I would not throw and only use for melee.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Mancatcher. You want some sort of flying collar that has a trigger near the joint at the middle to snap shut with a spring, so you only need to control it from one point. (You could have a second seal inside to allow you to unlock it, but it would take effort to push from the first point against the spring at the same time)

Once the victim is collared, he can be dragged forward into range or kept away if his sword gets too close. The mancer might gain an advantage in "tweezering" blades relative to one another, and in any case can reduce the ability of the mark to evade.

Since the mancer can't manipulate the collar very far away anyway, he could also have it at the end of a chain, the other end of which is connected to a winch and heavy weights in a way that could summon the mark to a most unpleasant meeting with some other blade lacking any seal or mobility at all.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Frame challenge!

Your question implies that the blade mages are basically a band of people into one. They are expected to use several swords for normal humans and act as if they are several humans using those swords. That only follows from the imposed restrictions.

However, within the confines of how blade magic works, it seems that the optimal route is not to be very focused on perfectly controlling a small amount of swords, but just get a crude control of a very large amount of very small blades.

Weight-wise, that works - if each blade roughly the size of a (very sharp) pizza cutter wheel, you still control dozens without incurring mental stress.

image of a pizza cutter - a small disk blade attached to a handle. The intended usage is to roll it on a pizza to cut it into pieces.

(this without the handle)

Moreover, you don't need to perfectly control them - a hundred pizza blades sweeping to an opponent will make them no less dead than a good stab from a normal sword. Only a hundred small blades are exceptionally hard to defend against. As opposed to there being a big sword or four. A pincer manoeuvre or just "surround and squeeze" with the blades is bound to hit.

Which turns towards the finesse of the operation. No need for anything fancier than commanding this block of blades to move here and the other block of blades to move there. Sure, you miss out on control but you more than make up for it with numbers and capacity to damage an opponent. Presumably the blade make can always focus on only few blades to make them move very precise, e.g., between armour plates.

Having a circular shape of the blades similarly aids in mass controlling them. You have a very high guarantee to cut. If not with one, then there are dozens more of the blades going towards the target. At least some should be able to cut them. If you really need extra guarantee, then you can have two (or more) interlocking circular shapes that define a sphere that will in whichever way it hits.

So, there you go - a blade mage shouldn't really focus on controlling large swords made for humans to use them. A blade mage should focus on controlling many small blades that will make mince meat of anything they hit.

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ (1/2) Again, economics: Having a hundred seals or more per mancer is so expensive that only the richest and most influential nobles living in the capital dimensions can afford that. An option for them, though. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 17:01
  • $\begingroup$ (2/2) Since I was not expecting "get 100 mini blades", I'll make it clear that taking control of multiple seals is mentally exhausting. For an 8-mancer? 15, sure! 20, kinda. 25, maybe. 50? At the same time? No. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 17:04
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @RibhuHooja you asked for an optimal weapon, I supplied it to you. You didn't specify that it has to be the most affordable, nor does the question actually specify the economics around seals. Given the parameters set in the question, I posit that exerting crude control on a large number of small blades is optimal. $\endgroup$
    – VLAZ
    Feb 9 at 17:05
1
$\begingroup$

Avoid using levitating blades. Use several crossbows with an enchanted piece that will pull the crossbow. Quite a simple action. Place the crossbow bolt with your hands and release the trigger. And crossbows are pretty easy to make, that's a plus

The main limitation of crossbows is their reload speed, but you can reload 6 very powerful crossbows per second. A powerful crossbow bolt capable of piercing 2 millimeters of steel! You can be a living machine gun!

$\endgroup$
4
  • $\begingroup$ That would mean 2 mechanisms per crossbow: One on the weapon itself and the other on whatever is drawing it. 3 unless the bolts are automatically fitted into it. So yeah, you would be better than a regular crossbowman at 2-4 bows depending on the number of mechanisms, but it would also be difficult to aim from a position not directly in front of you. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 17:17
  • $\begingroup$ >That would mean 2 mechanisms per crossbow: One on the weapon itself and the other on whatever is drawing it. I agree. But you can, for example, use a peg driven into the ground to fix the crossbow. Or any other object of the environment $\endgroup$
    – trotzt
    Feb 9 at 17:23
  • $\begingroup$ + 1 Ahhh, so you mean something like a fixed machinegun position. With a physical mechanism to slide the bolt in (or maybe something you can pull or smth like that), it would mean using only one mechanism. And if you need to go, activate the other mechanism on the crossbow and you still have 2-4 flying crossbows with you. Aiming is a problem, but you can train for that. $\endgroup$ Feb 9 at 17:27
  • $\begingroup$ @RibhuHooja By the way, you can just pull the crossbow by simply pressing it into the ground. Then only one enchanted detail will be needed. But you will need to make a rather complex movement with the crossbow, which can make aiming difficult and can be downright awkward. $\endgroup$
    – trotzt
    Feb 9 at 17:49

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.