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So as part of a worldbuilding project I've decided to write up basic specs for a fictional habitable planet and draw a map of its continents and climate, but my main concern is that I haven't quite drawn up the latter correctly. I've mostly been following Artifexian's guide for hot worlds (my planet having an average temeperature a bit above that of modern day Earth), but I'm not sure if I've done everything correctly.

Map of the planet (for reference, 3x3 pixels is 100km^2 and "mountains" just defines any land at least 750m above sea level):

enter image description here

enter image description here

..and here are the basic planet (and sun... and moon) specs:

Star:

  • Spectral Class: K1 V
  • Mass: 0.85 Suns

Planet:

  • Gravity: 0.723 g (7.089 m/s^2)
  • Mass: 0.521 Earths
  • Density: 0.85 Earths
  • Radius: 0.85 Earths
  • Surface Area: 338.8 Million km^2
  • Land/Sea Ratio: 27.8% Land, 72.2% Sea
  • Semimajor Axis: 0.78 AU
  • Year Length: 272.846 (0.747 Earth Years)
  • Day Length: 22.1 Hours (22 Hours 6 Minutes)
  • Eccentricity: 0.0202
  • Average Temperature: 17.1 Celsius (290.25 Kelvin)
  • Axial Tilt: 13.6 Degrees

Moon:

  • Mass: 1.32 Moons
  • Lunar Cycle: 28.4 Earth Days
  • Semimajor Axis: 316,000km
  • Eccentricity: 0.029

Last thing to note is that this planet is relatively young compared to earth and so it's more geologically active, with higher rate of earthquakes and volcanism.

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm having trouble working out the plate tectonics that would result in those two parallel mountain ranges in the western continent with the string of inland seas between them. $\endgroup$ – Salda007 Jan 26 at 9:36
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah I figured I was stretching believability with having those two mountain ranges, I mostly just drew them in for the rule of cool, with the weak excuse of it being more geologically active = wacky tectonics. If the geology was more realistic I would probably get rid of one of those mountain ranges, but I'm a bit more concerned with getting the planet's climate right than its geology $\endgroup$ – Gnowos Jan 26 at 9:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Salda007 you can have those, with one mountain range way older than the other one (see Northern America with the Rocky Mountains and the Appalachians). You need a small plate colliding with a large one (the area between the mountains collides with the large continent) and much later another small continent "crashes" in from the West. Though, the climate between those should be even drier than already shown in my opinion. $\endgroup$ – Erik Jan 26 at 13:55
  • $\begingroup$ @Gnowos I feel like the currents in your small sub-polar sea don't seem right, but I can't give a correct idea either, sorry. $\endgroup$ – Erik Jan 26 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ You put science-based on this. To see if the circulation patterns are reasonable would require running a General Circulation Climate Model. Which would require inputting the details of the configuration of your continents and oceans and the content of the atmosphere. Not going to happen. $\endgroup$ – puppetsock Jan 26 at 15:25
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I circled in red two things that make me perplex

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  • from the same area you have a cold and hot current diverging. It would make sense if they converged there.
  • a warm current starting from a polar region seems a bit odd (this also happens on the easternmost side)
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  • $\begingroup$ "From the same area you have a cold and hot current diverging. It would make sense if they converged there.... A warm current starting from a polar region seems a bit odd (this also happens on the easternmost side)" - That's because they're only warm currents relative to where they came from, I'm sure the currents themselves are cold but since it's traveling to were the ocean's even colder it's a warm current Edit. forget my answer to the first question this answer applies to both $\endgroup$ – Gnowos Jan 26 at 9:17

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