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I am making a continent for a RPG that I am planning to run. I am currently running one on a different continent in the same world. That world has Humans, Elves, Dwarves, Halfings and a handful of other less common / well known races. I wanted to make this other continent feel substantially different in flavour from the first one, so to accomplish this, I selected a different palet of races: weird elf like creatures that are very pale with pure black eyes, Minotaurs, Vedalken (tall, blue skinned humanoids, who are slightly amphibious, and highly intelligent), and Changelings (shapeshifters). After choosing those, I was wondering. Would it break immersion in the world, and make the world feel much less relateable if I refrained from including humans, as well as anything that more than vaguely resembles a human?

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    $\begingroup$ This is definitely a question for Writing SE rather than Worldbuilding SE, as it's more about managing audience expectations and reactions for "relatability" than constructing a setting per se. $\endgroup$ Jan 18, 2021 at 23:56
  • $\begingroup$ Most audiences seem to prefer familiarity. Appreciating the indescribable (immediately thinking of Lovecraftian designs) requires a good imagination and an epic narrative. You need to be as descriptive as possible where you can’t provide artwork for frame of reference. Personally I say go for it, think outside the box, show us something we’ve never seen before. Let the environment or the mechanics of your game stir your imagination. $\endgroup$ Jan 19, 2021 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ @DariusArcturus that sounds like an answer... $\endgroup$ Jan 19, 2021 at 1:20

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It will not break immersion. Humans are not needed.

To prove my point look at Nightfall. And read the books introduction. It doesn't contain any humans. Though yôu probably won't realize it, If you didn't read the introduction.

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Take a look at this setting (courtesy of the inimitable Arnold K.). The basic gist of it is that "true humans" went extinct centuries ago thanks to something known as the Time of Fire and Madness, but there are many humanoid species.

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