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Firstly, let us define the term "Super-Enceladus". In the context of this question, a "Super-Enceladus" is a moon that has permanent or near-permanent polar jets spewing out matter into space. These jets could be of any material; water, magma, or even CO2 could work, but the jets HAVE to continue going at all times. Now, could a moon like this be possible?

I can imagine a moon like this existing only with heavy tidal forces. In real life. Enceladus shares a 2:1 resonance with one of Saturn's other moons, Dione. It is thanks to this resonance that Enceladus boasts its polar jets. However, Dione is a small moon, and one could imagine that the effects on Enceladus would be stronger if Dione was bigger and could exert more gravitational force, similar to what we see on Jupiter's moon Io. Nonetheless, not even Io can achieve PERMANENT polar jets. So, is a permanent polar jet on a moon even possible, and if so, what ramifications would this moon's activities have on the rest of its home system?

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    $\begingroup$ I can unequivocally say that "PERMANENT" polar jets are impossible, due to the unavailability of infinite time in this universe. "permanent"? As in continuous over a geologically long period? maybe. Highly unlikely, because the source material will tend to get used up. "permanently" as in many years of continuous frequent activity? absolutely. One would also need to define "jets".. does Earth's 50000 tons of gas loss per year count as a "jet"? Most of this loss is through the polar regions where it can bypass the van Allen belts. "PERMANENT" is a strong word, with the tag of "science based" $\endgroup$ – PcMan Dec 28 '20 at 6:46
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    $\begingroup$ It is considered a good practice to wait with selecting the best answer and wait for all timezones to ahve an opportunity to contribute. $\endgroup$ – JANXOL Dec 28 '20 at 9:00
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I just came up with the question late at night, just before I went to sleep. I should time it better. $\endgroup$ – Nip Dip Dec 28 '20 at 16:52
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I think you are looking for two contrasting mechanisms here: as you correctly state, strong tidal forces are the most logic source for the jets. However, if the tidal forces come from a resonant orbit, they won't be permanent, but only present at the times when the two bodies are close enough. If instead the tidal forces come from the interaction with the main body, I suspect that the moon would be then tidally locked. Tidal lock reduces the amount of heat generated by the tidal forces, because it removes the strain due to the deformation of the body under the forces (remember that a tidally locked satellite doesn't change its relative orientation with respect to the body with whom it is locked). With tidal forces then it seems you have no way to get permanent jets.

Another possibility would be geothermal activity, something like a geyser powered by internal heat. It depends on your definition of permanent or semi-permanent. If thousands of years of periodic activity or fumarole are within your range of acceptance, you could go with them.

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  • $\begingroup$ If the moon was on the cusp of the Roche limit that could work; it could also create some interesting rings like Enceladus' E ring. $\endgroup$ – Nip Dip Dec 28 '20 at 6:48
  • $\begingroup$ All of the big moons around Jupiter and Saturn are tidally locked. It's the eccentricity of the orbit that causes the tidal heating: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tidal_heating_of_Io $\endgroup$ – SurpriseDog Dec 30 '20 at 2:51

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