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I have a lab in which many tests are done on prisoners. I need some kind of material that causes the body (whole or a part of it) to explode after injection. Is there any realistic material that explodes near blood or flesh? I also need it to take effect after at least 30 seconds because I need the nurse who injects it to be able to get far from the poor guy. (There is no maximum for the effect delay.)
It's better if the material doesn't affect the head and its shape because I need the prisoner to scream after explosion or in case of a sudden death, I need the prisoner's soulless face to be clearly visible to the people around.

Update
To make it more clear, the material better be liquid. My doctors mix it up with their own material which is to be tested on people. I don't care if mixing the first material with the second one is rational or not, I only need the people to explode (Not so dramatically, a little explosion does the job) after injection. If the results on the dead body are satisfying, then starting a new project to decrease explosion risk or to find an alternative for the first material will be considerable for the crew. Thanks for the answers.

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  • $\begingroup$ "explode after injection" - do you need this material to be injectable? $\endgroup$
    – Alexander
    Commented Dec 16, 2020 at 23:41
  • $\begingroup$ Does air count? There's news reports of people being stuck with air compressors and inflated to impressive size. Note that this requires a constant pump, although hospitals do normally have oxygen supplies. It's unclear how dangerous this would be to others (the nurse), although it's almost certainly fatal to the test subject (and rather painful until then). $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 0:00
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    $\begingroup$ Can't you just make up something that does exactly what you need for your story? You can assert that many tests went into getting its properties down exactly right. $\endgroup$
    – Willk
    Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 0:53
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    $\begingroup$ I'm with @Willk, inventing some technobabble is a good idea here because any real-life chemical that would react with, e.g., water would be too well known and your reader's reaction will be something like, "is the doctor an idiot? What was he expecting?" On the other hand, technobabble creates an air of mystery - and it's the mystery that allows the exploding prisoner to be believable. On the other hand, I'm sure if you inject enough red kool-aid, the prisoner will explode - after suffering from cancer. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 1:14
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    $\begingroup$ Watch some documentary about Unit 731, a Japanese bio-chemical weapons troop that uses civilians from China, Russia, and Korea to do human experiment during WWII. That will tell you what makes people blow up, because people did get blown up. $\endgroup$
    – user39178
    Commented Dec 18, 2020 at 15:12

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An explosion requires lots of energy, and that kind of energy just isn't chemically available with ordinary pharmaceuticals.

You can probably do that with some mixture such as tricyclic acetone peroxide, or some ethers. The problem here is that the injection would be incredibly painful from the first instant. Also, an injection can't be more than, say, 10 mL, so that's about ten grams of whatever.

With much handwaving, you could imagine a mixture of several esotic compounds - microspheres of hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine in an unstable liquid peroxide matrix. The microspheres are coated so that they can't dissolve in the matrix or in blood, and the matrix is viscous enough to, basically, block the vein. After very few seconds, the matrix reaction with blood increases the temperature to the point where the tricyclic acetone peroxide decomposes explosively, and that triggers the microspheres. The resulting explosion should range around 5g of ordinary TNT, enough to amputate the arm. The hydrostatic shock might kill the victim; but this is unlikely, unless they also had some condition that made this possible - delayed repolarization or LQTS is one; a sharp shock or thump administered at the wrong moment on the breast is then enough to send the victim into cardiac arrest.

Something like LQTS can be favoured by hypokaliemia, itself caused by poor diet or administration of diuretics.

However, why administer such a devil's brew on someone if it's not just to horrifically maim them? The explosive spheres have no other conceivable purpose; the APEX matrix alone, on the other hand might, I don't know... be used against some - waves hands quickly - blood parasites. You might not get an explosion with blood-diluted APEX alone, but rather a cooked-off, bloated arm. That would more than enough for your screaming requirements, though.

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  • $\begingroup$ It could be what I'm looking for. Can you attach links for the chemicals please? $\endgroup$
    – Bamdad
    Commented Dec 29, 2020 at 22:19
  • $\begingroup$ Well... not that I worry about Homeland Security :-) ... but you can easily find both the crude formula and the physical characteristics of all the named substances on ChemSearch (or even Google). However, what I said about polymer coating was apparently wrong. According to this paper, it is possible to resin-coat the exotic explosives, achieving a higher explosive yield (I'd dare say up to ten grams of TNT, which is quite a lot): imemg.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/… $\endgroup$
    – LSerni
    Commented Dec 29, 2020 at 22:38
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Depends on what you mean by "explosion". There's practically nothing that you can put in a syringe that wouldn't have immediate effect, but...

A Bitter Pill to Swallow

The nurse (presumably aiming to cause some literal fireworks) forces the victim to swallow a relatively large pill containing a chunk of caesium floating in mineral oil. Upon hitting their stomach, the plastic coating on the pill dissolves and the mineral oil is washed away, allowing contact between the water/acid solution in the stomach and the caesium.

Boom.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the idea, I will consider it, but look at my update. I don't need to kill them on purpose. I need to test my second material, which only works alongside the first one. The pills however, can help me in another context. Thank you. $\endgroup$
    – Bamdad
    Commented Dec 20, 2020 at 13:06
  • $\begingroup$ @Bamdad - if you don't intend to kill them on purpose by making them explode, you're asking for an impossibility here, as has been addressed by the remainder of the answers/comments. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Commented Dec 20, 2020 at 20:30
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The nurse inserts a catheter or similar and leaves the room.

Then this stuff is administered via catheter. https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2010/02/23/things_i_wont_work_with_dioxygen_difluoride

No one in their right mind would do this, as the result is... predictable...

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    $\begingroup$ The request was to make the person explode, not the building $\endgroup$
    – Separatrix
    Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 9:19
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    $\begingroup$ I'd be more concerned about the toxic by-products... $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 9:28
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    $\begingroup$ It would also be nearly impossible to "administer" FOOF, since it would react explosively with the catheter as well. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 17:27
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    $\begingroup$ Deliver it in something like liquid argon, at -190 degrees C should be sufficient carry it through. Although at that point the expanding liquid gas will make a mess as well. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 18, 2020 at 19:03
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Its a nitroglycerine compound for a heart treatment only a clerical error caused the dosage of nitroglycerine to be a few thousand times more than prescribed.

Nitroglycerine is used as a vascodilation medicine against heart and blood problems. They are normally taken through pills but your devil-may-cry method of prisoner testing let someone try an injected version. Its a big syringe.

The subject has been stuck not in a large vein and it takes a moment before it hits the heart and starts convulsions that make the nitro go off.

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chlorine trifluoride explodes when in contact with waster, also, there are many explosive chemical reactions with the chemicals in our body, and technically, we explode all the time, just not the whole of us, to get energy our body makes mini bombs-you might say- to extract the energy from our food

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Dexyan. This is in the low quality queue. I'm not 100% sure why, unless it's the observation that we "explode all the time." I get it, but it's not a helpful comment for the OP. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 20, 2020 at 20:50

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