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In our universe today, we do not know if it is possible to contact or even perceive other universes or realities, but just like out of nothingness our reality was born, certainly out of nothing other -1s are born every day creating universes out of 0s....negative energy is still energy, right? And if you put energy into nothingness, something starts, right?

This, if I understand right, our universe is not last nor first, we are but an instant in an infinite list of universes being born and dying in the glimpse of an eye, but this glimpse is perceived longer by us.

If so, would it be possible for one of those universes to be born with a connection to other universes, a connection that allows matter and light to travel from the universes without them fusing?

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    $\begingroup$ If two universes have a "connection" then they are one single universe, by definition. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Commented Dec 13, 2020 at 12:28
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    $\begingroup$ Hello Open, welcome to Worldbuilding. When you have a moment, please take our tour and read through the first two bullets of the help center. This is one of those questions where I'm forced to ask, "what are you, the OP, expecting?" You admit in your first sentence that we don't know... and then you ask if it's possible? The only answer we have is "We don't know." Are you really asking if something we know nothing about and can only express mathematically is physically possible? Or are you asking if it's believable? Are you asking for help building a world? Or just asking? $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 13, 2020 at 17:40
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    $\begingroup$ This is a good meat-and-potatoes type of query for Worldbuilding. But as JBH says, if you can clarify your expectation, I think you'll get a better reception. Just you are aware, your query is currently in the "close queue": this is not a bad thing and does not (necessarily) mean a question is bad. All it means is reviewers found something unclear that needs addressing. If your question gets closed, just edit it and nominate for reopening. $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Commented Dec 13, 2020 at 18:59
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    $\begingroup$ @elemtilas You're absolutely right that the topic is spot-on for this site. It's the way the Q's asked that makes me wonder about expectations (and I'm admittedly getting less tolerant of "is X possible in the real world?" questions). We live in a statistically infinitely large universe. If it were possible, it probably happened. If hasn't happened, it probably isn't possible. the gray area in between doesn't fall into "is it possible?" At best it falls into "is it believable?" For some reason people have stopped asking questions from that POV. Hence the query about expectations. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 13, 2020 at 22:05
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    $\begingroup$ @JBH -- I'd go for "is it believable" in this instance! We've already been told how universes actually work, which in my opinion rather defeats the whole purpose of not only this query but also this whole forum!, so I'd be happy with the alternative. Namely a fictional universe. $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Commented Dec 14, 2020 at 0:06

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Probably, depending on how you interpret "reality"

As far as we can see, our universe has a set of rules that don't really make sense logically. Elementary particles, fundamental forces, and other basis of physics don't have any reason or rhyme to them, they just are. If we assume that a pseudo-infinite amount of universes are created and destroyed outside of time, then what would prevent other universes from having slightly different laws of physics? What rules over physics in one universe may not apply to another. This way, a universe with a certain, more permissive set of fundamental rules may allow it to create stable passageways to other universes.

However, this probably has to also reconcile with the fact that universes need to be separated, because otherwise, since there are a pseudo-infinite amount of universes, we'd have a psuedo-infinite amount of universe-travellers, which we haven't observed.

A believable compromise would be that every iteration of bridged and non-bridged universe exists in some sense, whether in the future, the present, the past, or in no time at all (a la Many-worlds interpretation of Quantum Mechanics). We're just lucky (or unlucky) enough to live in a universe where we aren't observing a pseudo-infinite amount of universe-travellers.

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