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I have this idea of giant, literal flying fish. About the size of a megalodon (if impossible, it can be smaller, I just want them to be really big), they fly at speeds of 70 miles per hour (again, you can change the speed if that's too slow/fast), and they, well, have to be able to swim and fly. Could they evole, and if so, how would they fly?

The gravity isn't as strong as it is on Earth, and the atmosphere is thicker. Just how weak the gravity and thick the atmosphere, I haven't decided, though.

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Its "flying" is actually still swimming

The atmosphere of Venus at the surface is about 6% the density of liquid water - it is supracritical CO2 and in some respects behaves like a fluid. You could swim in it if you could swim, and you were tough enough to be sporting your Speedo on the surface of Venus.

Here is how you will get your fish that can fly as fast as it swims: it actually only swims. Regardless of whether it is over or under the water, the same motions that propel it thru the water can propel it thru the very dense atmosphere. It will probably be faster swimming thru the "air" because it will meet less resistance than it does from the liquid. It will have a buoyancy organ it can adjust to keep it neutrally buoyant in the gas or under the water.

My palantir has showed me the future comments which gently question whether a supracritical CO2 atmopshere would be compatible with a water ocean. The water is saturated with CO2 and so is strongly acidic. Planet Giant Flying Shark is not a planet for wusses, now.

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