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In many Christian (and I'd expect other religions's) prayers, Earth is mentioned.

Excerpt from Our Father:

Thy will be done on Earth as it is in Heaven.

Currently that's all still very applicable but in a future world where a not insignificant number of humans are living on the moon and other planets, would it be more likely to substitute the "Earth" with some other word there? Substituting for a single other planetoid doesn't seem right to me because that ignores anyone on an interplanetary voyage. In which case what word would be used? Or would "Earth" be left in for historical sake?

The society in question I'm building is Catholic missions on the moon and the moons of Jupiter (if the specific religion in question helps with answers).

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    $\begingroup$ This question might need to be closed as opinion-based, as it's only speculation as to what any organization would do. I could easily imagine Catholicism leaving the Lord's Prayer as-is because putting words in the Lord's mouth is generally a no-no, I can also imagine it as "Earth" becoming a metaphorical reference to "all Thy kingdom everywhere." On the other hand, It's not implausible that the reference would be updated to something like "Thy will be done in Thy Creation as it is in Heaven." Who's to say how any single (much less all) organization would react? (*continued*) $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 17:45
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    $\begingroup$ I am pretty sure that it is "on earth as it is in heaven", that is, lower case e, meaning "on the ground", "in this real world". No way the Greek original had a reference to the planet we name "Earth" in English; first of all, when the prayer was composed, Earth was not a planet... The original Greek is "γενηθήτω τὸ θέλημά σου ὡς ἐν οὐρανῷ καὶ ἐπὶ γῆς" (genēthētō to thelēma sou hōs en ouranō kai epi gēs) meaning literally "let your will be realised on the ground as in the sky". The ancient Latin translation preserves this meaning: fiat voluntas tua sicut in cælo et in terra. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 17:45
  • $\begingroup$ ... This might be one of those unusual cases where you need to make a "logical" choice as a component of the plot of your book rather than seeking some kind of authoritative decision. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 17:46
  • $\begingroup$ I seriously doubt the concept or memory of 'earth' as a whole would ever be lost, barring some seriously crazy apocalypse that destroys all knowledge of it. $\endgroup$
    – Sync
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 17:47

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"Earth" in these texts essentially just means "not heaven". It wasn't meant to refer to a planet, but to the domain of human beings.

Today people talk about Martian geography even though "geo" comes from the same Greek root as the word that was translated as "Earth" in that prayer, and about Martian terrain even though that comes from the corresponding Latin root. Arguably those sorts of uses make more sense than the ones that restrict Earth/Terra/Ge to a single planet.

It seems realistic to me that your missionaries would say "Earth" in the prayer while understanding that it doesn't refer to the planet. Words can have more than one meaning, and many words derived from these roots already do.

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    $\begingroup$ This is a good answer with a great perspective. +1 But it's worth pointing out that since the spherical nature of the world hadn't been discovered when the texts were originally written, "not heaven" meant "down here where the dirt is." $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Dec 8, 2020 at 18:54
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In all translations of the Bible I have looked at the word 'earth' in the Lord's Prayer is not capitalised, suggesting it is not referring to this specific planet. My understanding is that it signifies the 'mortal realms' as in the physical world as compared to the spirtitual realms.

From a wikipedia article on Adamah, the word used for earth in the creation story in Genisis:

Adamah (Biblical Hebrew : אדמה) is a word, translatable as ground or earth, which occurs in the Biblical account of Creation of the Book of Genesis.[1] The etymological link between the word adamah and the word adam is used to reinforce the teleological link between humankind and the ground, emphasising both the way in which man was created to cultivate the world, and how he originated from the "dust of the ground".[1] Because man is both made from the adamah and inhabits it, his duty to realise his own potential is linked to a corresponding duty to the earth.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adamah

I think thos reinforces the idea that in Christian thinking it is 'earth' and not 'Earth' and so can refer to all creation.

So to answer your question there arn't necessarily references to The Earth to be replacedin Chritian prayer. Maybe references to 'earth' might be kept, or replaced with something more generic like 'creation'.

I can't answer for other religions however, but hope this is helpful.

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Earth would very much be a part of religion, barring a apocalypse that erases all knowledge of human history-Earth, Gaia, Terra, would all be good terms for earth, but there may be new terms created to represent the cradle of humanity-the possibilities are literally endless.

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