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Kaitlyn, protagonist of my series “The Vault”, has a very interesting ability, among her vast set of abilities. She can change her biochemical structure to survive Antarctic cold and volcanic heat, while still being able to exist in an reducing atmosphere at SATP (i.e. Earth’s conditions). That also changes her internal temperature accordingly, and grants her new abilities based on her internal temperature. When she cools down, she begins generating chemicals that react endothermically when exhaled, cooling down her already ultracold breath to weapons-grade frigid.

And when she cranks the heat up, cavities in her muscular arms begin producing and compressing gases that ignite as they escape her body via her palms. How would it be possible to rewrite the biochemical structure of an organism without killing it? Sure, her body is capable of adapting to her environment much faster than a human body, and she can quickly replace damaged tissue, but I’d like to know in particular how to safely change an organism’s biochemistry.

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    $\begingroup$ Forget the bio- part, and try imagining how to change the chemistry of a simple machine, say for example a steam locomotive, while it is operating. So, why the locomotive is pulling a train, imagine a process chaging the iron, coal and water into something else which would enable the engine to function in an atmosphere in which oxygen is replaced by a reducing has, for example hydrogen sulfide. Surely if changing the chemistry of a human being is possible it should be trivial to do that to a locomotive. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:42
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    $\begingroup$ Consider that you already have imaginary biological methods for her abilities. You can just handwave it with biological methods like more DNA and thus more specific proteins/enzymes that can change practically everything for example. Seeing in the (sudden) dark is regulated quickly by changing the RNA used. Extend it for your purposes. $\endgroup$
    – Trioxidane
    Dec 4, 2020 at 15:42
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, enzymes. That's how I'm going to explain this. $\endgroup$ Dec 4, 2020 at 18:47

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It’s not possible to safely change an organism’s biochemistry. It’s a reality check that isn’t reality, so the “I want to know how to do it safely” can’t be answered. Your story is in fiction, my friend. There will be no real-life Kaitlyn.

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