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Looking for a term:

I am worldbuilding a government that elects representatives to positions of authority, but those representatives customarily refer day-to-day and big decisions back to the electorate. This happens in a daily meeting that takes place online.

Agendas are published twelve hours ahead. Voters are expected to show up informed on the issues they care about, and abstain where they don't care. The meeting provides time for voters to be recognized to ask questions or argue perspectives. A quick vote that isn't binding on the representative, but is usually used as a guide to the final decision, ends each agenda point.

Any voter can call for a removal of a representative or a whole administration at larger, monthly events.

Is there an existing term for such a form of government? Is it just a representative democracy?

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  • $\begingroup$ From a practical perspective, how is this different from the U.S. political model today? We can all contact our representatives, let them know about our position on the matter, and our efforts are in no way binding. Other than being impractical (managing a meeting with 1,000,000 constituents where 50,000 of them want a chance to speak would be impossible), I can't see where this is different. We can even vote to impeach and do it at any time. $\endgroup$ – JBH Oct 26 at 14:51
  • $\begingroup$ @jbh there’s an expectation that the guidance is followed (such an event would be an exceptional case, not the rule) I’m not sure that in a representative democracy that most people expect the same. Willing to admit it might not be something new, but wanted to check $\endgroup$ – James McLellan Oct 26 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ Daily meetings and votes with millions of people? No thanks. Weekly referenda might be workable. $\endgroup$ – StephenS Oct 26 at 18:07
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    $\begingroup$ How large is the society? How does a daily online meeting scale with 1 thousand, 1 million, 1 billion citizens? There's only so much Q&A time: who arbitrates which/whose question gets asked? How do you deal with people who keep calling no-confidence votes when they're unhappy with how their issue is resolved? How and who actually enforces that "Voters show up informed on the issues they care about, and abstain where they don't care."? IME that rarely happens with humans, and the ones who talk the most aren't necessarily best-informed. Ultimately who prevents these meetings deteriorating? $\endgroup$ – smci Oct 26 at 22:58
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    $\begingroup$ Heh heh. You want to run the entire country the way stack-exchange is run. That's funny. You think you need a word for something that would fail that quickly? Anyway, this isn't the place to ask for the word for things. There's another SE for that. $\endgroup$ – puppetsock Oct 27 at 0:17
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It's called direct democracy

Direct democracy or pure democracy is a form of democracy in which people decide on policy initiatives directly. This differs from the majority of currently established democracies, which are representative democracies. The theory and practice of direct democracy and participation as its common characteristic was the core of work of many theorists, philosophers, politicians, and social critics, among whom the most important is Jean Jacques Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, and G.D.H. Cole.

In direct democracy, people decide on policies without any intermediary. Depending on the particular system in use, direct democracy might entail passing executive decisions, the use of sortition, making laws, directly electing or dismissing officials, and conducting trials.

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If the vote by individuals is not binding, then it is just a representative democracy / or republic.

Many elected representatives already listen to and are influenced by their constituents. They even have town halls and polls of the electorate. This is not to say they have daily feedback, but that does not constitute an essential difference compared to what you propose.

Representatives could gradually change to incorporate an expected daily vote/feedback without changing any rules or structure of the government.

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