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In my worldbuilding, I have physically moved the whole Old World (Africa, Asia, Europe and Australia) so far eastward that the Prime Meridian is in Europe's farthest city, Lisbon, rather than Greenwich. This results in a wider Atlantic as well as a land bridge linking Asia to North America.

How would this change affect ocean circulation?

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closed as too broad by ArtOfCode, Thucydides, Magic-Mouse, bilbo_pingouin, Ghanima Jun 11 '15 at 7:56

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Doesn't this question fit better on EarthScience.SE? $\endgroup$ – Aify Jun 9 '15 at 21:43
  • $\begingroup$ I would suggest we put this on hold for the meantime. $\endgroup$ – Vincent Jun 9 '15 at 22:31
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnWDailey I can appreciate that you got the answer you wanted but the long term purpose of questions on any SE site is to make it useful for others in the future. Changing the title/question was specifically intended to make it more usable to future users. The original, and now restored title does nothing to help a person with a question to identify what is asked and answered in the post. $\endgroup$ – James Jun 10 '15 at 20:27
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    $\begingroup$ The edits to your titles are happening because they make your questions clearer. Rolling them back is unhelpful as it makes your questions harder to find for people who want to answer them. Community editing is here for this purpose; unless you strongly disagree with an edit or it's incorrect, it's a good idea to let the processes do their jobs. $\endgroup$ – ArtOfCode Jun 10 '15 at 20:45
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    $\begingroup$ this question does not match the title at all. $\endgroup$ – Oldcat Jun 10 '15 at 23:32
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1)That's only about 800 km. for Lisbon. Widening the Atlantic that much really should not affect the circulation patterns. Closing the gap at the northern Pacific also should not make much difference, since there is almost no oceanic circulation through the Bering Straits. Otherwise, there doesn't seem any good reason to assume the global conveyor would be affected.

2) I think that the above is based on what you meant, but you should be aware that the prime meridian was not picked on any geographic basis. It was essentially a political decision, and the dominant factor was the preeminence of British trade, which always used the British navigation tables and maps with Greenwich defined as the prime meridian. International acceptance occurred in 1884. The French were miffed (they argued forcefully for Paris), and went their own way for nearly 30 years.

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  • $\begingroup$ Bearing straight closing would heavily isolate the arctic,no? Pacific wouldnt change much, but arctic could. $\endgroup$ – Twelfth Jun 9 '15 at 23:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Twelfth, most arctic circulation goes through the north Atlantic, not the Bering Strait. $\endgroup$ – Mark Jun 10 '15 at 0:03
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    $\begingroup$ @Twelfth - The Bering Straits are only 50 miles wide, and average less than 150 feet deep. That won't let much water through, and the Straits are not known for their strong current. $\endgroup$ – WhatRoughBeast Jun 10 '15 at 0:08
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The answer is that there really is no simple answer. You need to get an ocean circulation model that lets you modify the geography (start looking here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ocean_circulation_models ), put in your proposed changes, and see what happens. Then you'll probably want an atmospheric/climate model coupled to it...

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