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My question is Imagine an arctic or antarctic region and here have tectonic plates collide or diverge, or slide on each other , so to have some sort of activity ...

First question is it possible for tectonic plates to meet at the poles?

Second question if volcanic activity is present can this alter the climate?

If so at what degree? Would it just melt some snow around or it could create a microclime that can allow people and animals and plants to live there?

Also not just on pole but also on the surroundings.

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    $\begingroup$ For example, Iceland is situated right on top of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the divergent boundary between the Eurasian and North American plates. This produces the famous volcanoes and geothermal springs of Iceland. However, what makes Iceland inhabitable is not the volcanism or the geothermal geysers, but the fact that the island sits on the path of two branches of the North Atlantic Current, which bring relatively warm water and moderate the climate just enough to bring it from uninhabitable arctic frigidity to barely tolerable subarctic misery. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Aug 14 '20 at 13:50
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Enceladus has a volcano on its south pole. It's eruptions formed the E ring of Saturn.

The Antarctic plate isn't always at the south pole. It currently is, and is moving towards the Atlantic ocean at about 1cm per year, but in order to get there, its tectonic boundaries have crossed the south pole at least once.

Volcano eruptions usually spew out ash clouds, which cool things down. After the erruption, the settling ash would darken the ice, increasing its absorption of sunlight and heating it up slightly. This could lead to an interesting hotter / colder cycle.

A massive hot vent that doesn't erupt could heat the surrounding air and land, but rather than just make a nice contour of temperatures would probably also increase storm activity.

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First question is it possible for tectonic plates to meet at the poles?

Absolutely. The Gakkel Ridge is an active divergent boundary on today's earth. A convergent boundary doesn't exist today (but they are close, e.g. Aleutan trench !), but there's no reason that it couldn't exist at all through a planet's history, if there are plate tectonics on such a planet.

Second question if volcanic activity is present can this alter the climate?

Depends. Huge single eruptions a la Tambora or even Toba will likely cause short time cooling ("volcanic winter"). But really huge basalt flows ("flood basalts") can release so much greenhouse gases that thawing starts over a longer period. This is one of the hypotheses' for helping an earth-like planet out of a snow- or slushball state ;-)

If so at what degree? Would it just melt some snow around or it could create a microclime that can allow people and animals and plants to live there?

Local melting from lave flows or albedo change by dark ash cover can have an influence, but as soon as the cover is gone and the lava has cooled climatic conditions will return to status ante. Volcanic winters also don't last long (some say their influence is overestimated, but that's boring science). Make it a nice flood basalt à la Dekkan traps, huge CO2 release and no Himalaya sized mountain ranges that could cool via weathering.

So, tl;dr: Yes, tectonic activity doesn't stop at the poles. Impact of volcanic events depend on size and timeline, up to planetary effects over the course of a few million years. But as this is world-building, anything can happen :-)

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