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I am aware of the accident when a physicist had a particle beam go through his head, though information on how that happened is scant except for a "safety measure fail".

I am trying to build a scenario where a group of people happen to be present inside a detector at the time of a collision. This is quite problematic since the interlocks would have to be disabled for people to be there when the beam is on, which I am yet to figure out. And if I am to have the beam go through someone, I would have to remove the beam pipe and the collision has to happen outside of the vacuum.

If the collision happened while people are there, would the ionizing radiation make chances of survival nil? What else can happen?

EDIT : Thank you for the comments, guys. Far as I have researched, they actively pump oxygen into the detector cavern of the LHC (they even have oxygen level detectors) so it is not a vacuum though the inside of the beam pipes are. The LHC detectors are huge, 50 feet high. The particle collider that I am going to be using is larger and more futuristic, similar to the proposed Future Circular Collider with a 100km tunnel. And no it is not idle curiosity. If I am to design this collider in such a way to make it possible for this scenario to happen, I need to figure out how the proton beam would act if it is to shoot out of the beam pipe, colliding with gas molecules in the process and collide at the center of the detector while people are present. As for the case of the Russian physicist, the beam went through his head and we got to see what happened, but I am building this scenario where people are near when a collision of two proton beams takes place, scattering particles out in all directions.

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    $\begingroup$ The inside of a particle accelerator is a vacuum, the best vacuum human ingenuity can make. People cannot live in a vacuum. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Aug 7, 2020 at 11:30
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    $\begingroup$ @AlexP he's saying the people are in the detector. Still a vacuum in most cases, but can make a difference. Maybe one that isn't in operation, while the particle beam is active? $\endgroup$
    – Trioxidane
    Aug 7, 2020 at 11:35
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    $\begingroup$ @Trioxidane: Inside the detector? Have they been miniaturized first? A detector is not some sort of room with lots of empty space inside where a human can fit. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Aug 7, 2020 at 11:38
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    $\begingroup$ Nothing the probability of being shot by a particle is infinitely low. $\endgroup$
    – Alays
    Aug 7, 2020 at 11:45
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    $\begingroup$ @AlexP Aren't some of the detectors of the LHC rather large, because it's an array of detectors? I can't find it right now on a cursory search though. I might've remembered it incorrectly. Anyway I think he just wants them be exposed to it. So best to think of a way how that can happen I guess. $\endgroup$
    – Trioxidane
    Aug 7, 2020 at 12:00

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There is the "experimantal answer" to you question. There is USSR and Russia scientist, Anatoly Bugorsky who managed to get into partcle accelerator during launch. He is still alive as far as I know.

He was lucky (more or less), but for most cases person woud recieve lethal dose of radiation and would expire in several days.

UPD: narrow proton beam is far less dangerous than wide stream of all kinds of radiation after impact.

Proton beam burns through relativly small portion of body. If person got lucky - he would suvivive. It's like being stabbed by knife (single time) - you will not die immediatly and have a good chance of suvival if you get to hospital fast. Even when hit into a heart. Even if all the tissues that were hit turn in radiactie charcoal it still would not be 100% death (but about 60-80%)

Cascades of radiation on the other hand hit the whole body at once. All body parts get radiated. It is a garantee heаvy radiation sickness. In best case human would fall unconscious die in a minutes due to haemorrhage and cell destruction all over the body (and get visible burns). In worst case he would be dying several days for internal organs failure.

For best visualisation - just immagine gaint microwave oven. Radiation effects organic matter in same way.

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Probably nothing

I'm not an expert I have to say. Still, many of the particle accelerators are testing with tiny bits of particles and not a large beam (again, could be wrong). That way they can detect isolated instances of a colision occurring. Although the particles have huge amounts of energy, they are still tiny particles. The detectors are very sensitive to detect the tiniest of results. Being near the colision will probably result in an insignificant dose of radiation at worst.

Being hit directly by a particle (beam) also depends a lot on the experiments. Some might just pass straight through you. The one where a scientist was hit is a particle beam and not a single one. Depending on the material hit and decay of atoms they can be highly radioactieve or fuse material. I think the best is to ask yourself what the effects you wantbto have are and find a plausible accelerator and particle experiment.

But like any experiment, it'll never give superpowers or something. What most people forget is that these things are destructive. If you destroy genes or cells, you don't really get something extra. (With some really weird exceptions, like a guy getting hit in the head and being a master at maths afterwards. Probably has to do with some inhibiting factors of the brain being removed due to brain damage.)

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