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Could a species that naturally produces an obsidian/flint like material exist ?

Or to put it more accurately could an obsidian/flint like material that is purely of biological origin (and not the result of naturally occurring volcanic or lightning activity) exist ?

If so what would it look like ? I mean by this what type of creature/species/family would this characteristic be most likely/implausibly to evolve out from ?

I'm assuming that this is COMPLETELY IMPOSSIBLE in real life but if we were to take a much more unrealistic and fantastical approach what would be the most quasi-plausible way to go about this ?

I'm thinking some kind of fantasy underwater giant coral-like species could do the trick ?

Or perhaps a mammal/reptilian/land-based creature that would excrete huge amounts of feces that would turn into an obsidian/flint like substance upon coming into contact with the air/solidifying ?

Or why not simply both at the same time, they could potentially occupy different ecological niches but produce a similar substance ?

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Flint (which is a cryptocrystalline form of quartz) is of biological origin. Volcanic activity and lightning have nothing to do with it. The exact process of flint formation is not yet fully understood, but it is clear that flint is formed in chalk or limestone (which are sedimentary rocks of biological origin). Fossils are occasionally found trapped in flint. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Aug 6 '20 at 16:22
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    $\begingroup$ Is, instead of creating it organically, it allowed to have the creatures indigest some and use it? $\endgroup$
    – Trioxidane
    Aug 6 '20 at 20:34
  • $\begingroup$ @Trioxidane Yes, I guess that's a good solution also, what did you have in mind ? $\endgroup$ Aug 7 '20 at 9:17
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    $\begingroup$ @Theexurbmm10a I think I already gave my best solution with the amber, but otherwise it's possible that some creatures digest some of it and it filters into bones, nails or something similar. But my later idea of amber makes more sense to me. Unless you want me to check out what digestion of obsidian can do for you, I'll leave it like this. $\endgroup$
    – Trioxidane
    Aug 7 '20 at 9:40
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    $\begingroup$ @Trioxidane I agree, I think the amber solution is quite fitting. Thanks again ! $\endgroup$ Aug 7 '20 at 9:57
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Amber

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amber

Amber is, as you can see in the link, fossilised tree resin. The resin is a syrupy substance. If it transforms to amber it is a hard substance that is a lot like a crystal. It isn't a stretch to the imagination that a creature or plant might excrete something like this that turns incredibly hard like obsidian after some time. It has more advantages, as it can fill holes and such into any shape you desire. Narrative it can be even more versatile, as you could even imagine a way to turn it back to a syrupy form and mould it in any way they see fit.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the help ! Come to think of it this makes a lot of sense. $\endgroup$ Aug 7 '20 at 9:18
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If you take a close look at dental enamel you will find it is a hard mineral - between 5 and 6 on the Mohs scale -- and does pretty well for biological functions requiring extreme hardness.

It's not obsidian, but if it was the right color - not hard with an additive -- would you know the difference?

Clearly it is possibly for animals to produce this typeof material, and given sufficient engineering you could probably get close to what you want.

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    $\begingroup$ And if you look beyond vertebrate teeth, you find many organisms (for instance diatoms) that secrete silicon dioxide. Since basalt is mainly SiO2, it would seem plausible for larger animals to have evolved basalt-like structures. $\endgroup$
    – jamesqf
    Aug 7 '20 at 17:11

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