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I've always heard that FTL travel would be essentially going back in time, but it's conventionally used in terms of traveling interstellar distances. So, if you orbited the solar system via FTL travel (I chose the solar system just for the lower centripetal force vs. orbiting the earth at above light speed, I assume it would be too tight a curve), assuming this has been achieved, and we're talking say, Star Wars style hyper-drive rather than a warp/Alcubierre drive and somehow you just push on through light speed with propulsion, when you slowed down would you be in earth's past time frame?

Or would you just have wasted a bunch of time and energy? And of course now I'm realizing that this is basically the superman spins round the earth and it reverses thing from the movie (spoilers, that's what was supposedly happening there, backwards time travel). Sorry for the vague-ass initial question, and feel free to recommend I throw this at the physics boards.

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    $\begingroup$ Hello Jimmy. Welcome to the site! This question doesn't appear to be the correct format for this site. As it is, this question (or something like it) should be posted on the Physics SE. $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre May 22 '15 at 12:51
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    $\begingroup$ So, is this a 'how does FTL travel = time travel' question, or a 'how far would you have to go to orbit the solar system' question? And what do you mean by 'solution'? FTL travel is impossible, as is time travel, so you'd have to solve a lot of things before doing this. $\endgroup$ – DaaaahWhoosh May 22 '15 at 12:57
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Jimmy, try to add some more text to your question to make it more clear what you are asking. If you are in doubt try and look in to some other questions, preferred the ones with many points as inspiration. $\endgroup$ – Magic-Mouse May 22 '15 at 13:01
  • $\begingroup$ @DaaaahWhoosh It is impossible with our current tech. A speculative Alcubierre drive could still be used, although I doubt that is what OP is asking for.... $\endgroup$ – JDSweetBeat May 22 '15 at 13:13
  • $\begingroup$ Is this on topic or simple not clear? With [a lot of] rephrasing this would fit within the scopes of this site or our Physics Stack exchange $\endgroup$ – JDSweetBeat May 22 '15 at 13:21
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No. There is no way to travel back in time. You could in theory leave in 2050 and come back in 2200 if you accelerated to near the speed of light. I am not exactly sure how you would get back to your own time, though. If you simply want FTL, then your best bet would be an Alcubierre drive.

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    $\begingroup$ I recommend reading this if you are interested in the topic of time travel. $\endgroup$ – JDSweetBeat May 22 '15 at 13:19
  • $\begingroup$ You should understand why FTL implies time travel. Learn about S-T diagrams and plotting "events" in space and time, and world lines of normal relativistic travel. Then plot some suplerlumal transits and you will see that the meaning of velocity (FTL) doesn't even have a clear single interpretation. The bit about orbits and such is irrelevant. Do donuts if you want. Go from here to a point near Jupiter 5 minutes later. The key is realizing that it doesn't matter what reference frame you're in. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz May 23 '15 at 8:07
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    $\begingroup$ "somehow you just push on through light speed with propulsion" er, no. Imagine a tomato in a vice, gets closer to, zero width as you crank it harder. Can you just push through zero and turn it inside out? You need to hit Physics.SE and look up some general intro on Special Relativity. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz May 23 '15 at 8:10

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