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My world is basically the surviving chunks of an exploded planet (there's a little more to it than that but that's the important part for the question, ignore any issues of gravity etc.) and while trying to come up with geography and interesting locations I realised that some of those chunks would originally have been on the ocean floor.

The question is pretty simple, would a chunk of the ocean floor (minimum size something like France or Spain up to the same size as Canada, China or similar) dried out and left for a few thousand years to grow vegetation etc. have any interesting or defining features?
Or would it just look like any other normal landscape?

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    $\begingroup$ Iceland is a piece of oceanic crust lifted above sea level. Have you tried to search for pictures of Icelandic landscapes? Also, the Alps were unce upon a time under water. Most of Hungary and a sizeable part of Romania were once upon a time under water -- the Paratethys Sea. One third of the Netherlands consists of land reclaimed from the sea in the last few centuries. It all depends what you mean by "ocean floor". $\endgroup$ – AlexP Apr 12 at 11:37
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    $\begingroup$ It would probably look like Colorado or Utah. $\endgroup$ – Michael Kutz Apr 12 at 11:38
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    $\begingroup$ As Dutch and proud of our polders, I of course need to comment. One of our largest polders is the Noordoostpolder which was reclaimed from the sea in 1942 (official date, all pre-work took a bit longer). During the second world war we already started building farms. Some parts of the polder could already be used for planting rye after a year. Of course the ocean bottom in the Netherlands is very clay like, so that helps a lot. $\endgroup$ – D.J. Klomp Apr 12 at 15:38
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexP I didn't know that about Iceland, I'll have a look at that for inspiration. I hadn't considered the Netherlands, I'll check that out too. It's sounding like it's not going to lead to anything particularly different or unusual though. $\endgroup$ – adaliabooks Apr 12 at 15:57
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Thanks to plate tectonics several such places exist, and they look like fairly normal terrain on the surface. the geology is noticeably unique but that has little impact on vegetation.

Note however that chucks forming a new world will not carry physical characteristics of their original world, the heat and pressure of planetary formation will liquefy the rock. As long as the planet is round its formation will liquefy the chucks of rock used to make it.

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  • $\begingroup$ That's kind of what I thought but I thought it was best to double check incase there were any particularly unique features that you might expect to find. The chunks don't form a new world, they're just suspended as they were before the planet cracked apart, they're just no longer connected together (it's magic) $\endgroup$ – adaliabooks Apr 12 at 16:00
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First place to look is basalt. As the article explains "crustal portions of oceanic plates" are largely made from it. The article also lists islands and other areas with basalt useful as a references.

Second is evaporites, specifically marine evaporites. Depending on how all this happened you might end up with some and some ocean floor comes ready with deep layers of evaporites. For example the Mediterranean has dried out when the Gibraltar has been closed and has lots of evaporites.

Third is pelagic sediment which is about the sediment that accumulated in the sea floor. The article has links to chalk and diatomaceous earth which should serve as examples.

These should give some ideas of the kinds of terrain and mineral.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yep, most of the seafloor is covered with mud thickening to clay, not necessarily something that will turn into arable soil. $\endgroup$ – jeffronicus Apr 12 at 19:38
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Think Kansas: wide, flat, open plains with occasional limestone protrusions. Kansas was (in fact) covered by an ocean from the Cambrian to the Devonian eras. The land is largely flat because ocean waters and currents tend to distribute falling silt and organic matter evenly over the seabed. The limestone protrusions occur where there were concentrations of life: deposits of calcium carbonate produced by corals and similar creatures that built up over millions of years.

Of course, this geology only occurs in the central portions of tectonic plates. near the boundaries there can be significant folding of the crust (mountains and valleys) produced by compaction. And depending how long it has free of water there will be varying degrees of erosion: 'young' Kansas landscapes will be relatively uniform and smooth while 'young' mountain ranges will be sharp and angular; 'old' Kansas landscapes will be cut by rivers, and the extrusions will be cut into the kind of standing stones we see in the US midwest; 'old' mountain will wear down into softer, rolling hills.

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