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Got this idea in my head the other day. How big would a werewolf have to be to accommodate a human's weight? Twice the size? Anatomy wise there are bipedal but are capable of running on all fours.

As for what the werewolf would look like, something like this.

(Artwork done by my friend Entar0178 on Deviantart)

Werewolf mount art

As you can see, a big saddle on its back for the rider, possibly with reins, saddlebags etc, maybe a bit more armor for protection depending on the situation. The werewolf running on all fours would be able transport the rider a great distance, although standing up would probably knock the rider off. Also having a rider on its back would probably hinder its ability to fight.

I dunno, what do you think? Do you think a werewolf mount is practical or not?

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    $\begingroup$ As written this post looks more line an attempt to start a discussion in a forum than a specific answerable question. Can you edit your post so that it clearly asks a single question? $\endgroup$ – sphennings Mar 15 at 22:11
  • $\begingroup$ Assuming your werewolf has non-magical muscles & bones, the rule of thumb (for horses - I've never ridden anything else) is that you want the rider to be no more than 20% of the mount's weight. So your shapeshifting werewolf mount has a major conservation of mass problem. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Mar 16 at 4:18
  • $\begingroup$ If you're looking for a reality-check type answer, then my answer to this question should cover most of the points (unfortunately not in the werewolf's favour). Your werewolves will have an additional issue in that their spines will need further compromises to enable them to walk bipedally as well as on all-fours, which will probably impact load strength. worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/a/138051/48681 $\endgroup$ – Ynneadwraith Mar 17 at 9:38
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Impractical

Mounts are a great way to move from point A to point B. But here's the thing - consistency matters when it comes to things like logistics and tactics. Cavalry are good because you can also use the horses to transport them and their equipment in the process. Same thing with messengers on horses - they can use horses to travel long distances because horses are always horses.

Werewolves, typically, are human except on nights with a full moon, which means they are useful for about 12 hours every 29 1/2 days. Sure, a werewolf of a large enough size could be ridden. But it wouldn't make for a practical mount, because it's not a mount often enough. Werewolf cavalry are useless unless you're fighting in the middle of the night on a specific night, which brings it's own problems. Werewolf messengers are useless, again, for the same reasons and also because you don't need a rider if you're sending an intelligent werewolf. Ultimately, a horse is better for riding, at least 98.3% of the time when it's not a night with the full moon showing.

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    $\begingroup$ I always had trouble with the way werewolves worked. Its full moon and they change, but some clouds can suddenly protect them sometimes? And some werewolves can change at will (especially in vampire vs werewolf stories). At that point you have to wonder: if full moon forces them to a werewolf form, does the no-moon period force them into human form? And inbetween they can change at will? The rules around werewolves are by no means set in stone. $\endgroup$ – Demigan Mar 15 at 22:31
  • $\begingroup$ @Demigan Well, they used to be set in stone until certain authors decided to screw with the rules. Not that I'm pointing fingers at anyone particular author, or even perhaps an entire genre devoted to turning the once-great creatures of the night into angst-ridden fluff. Nope. Not pointing fingers. $\endgroup$ – Halfthawed Mar 15 at 22:34
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    $\begingroup$ I dont think the old one's were set it in stone either? What I remember is incredibly vague. They change at full moon even if they are inside, but cloud cover can protect them. If shot in the leg they will recover but still limp, if shot through the heart they recover but have a scar or small wound still remaining. Its a messy and often inconsistent amount of traits. $\endgroup$ – Demigan Mar 16 at 7:03
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As big as a horse (or a pony), as long as he's on all fours.

Horses are build for their own weight give or take some kilo's, so having a rider and some gear isnt too much of a problem for domesticated horses especially those that get accustomed to a rider. The same would be true for a werewolf.

Although if you can convince an 800+ kilo piece of muscle, fang and claws to let itself be ridden is a different question altogether. And you can even wonder if there is anything gained from riding it?

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