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Picture this, a highly volcanic island sitting in the middle of a temperate or sub-arctic sea, the heat generated by the magma beneath the island and the volcano heats the air enough to generate a constant thunderstorm or even hurricaine.

Is this possible? I know volcanism can prevent the collection of snow or ice, but I wonder if this could happen.

If it could, would the island even be habitable?

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    $\begingroup$ An average geothermal vent releases in the neighborhood of 10^3 watts. A hurricane releases in the neighborhood of 10^14 watts. Seems like your very-large-island would need many, many billions of such vents evenly distributed to pump enough energy into the atmosphere, spread enough to get cyclonic motion going. And it would indeed be an awful place to try and live. $\endgroup$ – user535733 Feb 23 at 19:01
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Yes, rain-bearing pyrocumulus clouds can form over any sufficiently intense heat source, typically forest of brush fires (but also atomic bomb explosions). There's no reason why a correctly-engineered volcano, given the right humidity and prevailing wind, should not generate one of these downwind of the crater. What it won't generate is a hurricane, being effectively a point heat source.

Also check out lenticular clouds, which, due to rising moist air, give some mountains a more of less permanent cloud cap.Cap cloud

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