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Cyclopia syndrome is a disorder which affects both Giants and Yetis in which in afflicted has only one eye. now Cyclops syndrome is a real thing where the embryonic prosencephalon fails to properly divide the orbits of the eye into two cavities the only problem is that none of them ever reach adulthood or even past a day (and yes the wiki link is quite disturbing). The question I want to know is could a diseases or disorder exist were the victim has only one eye but are still viable(as in are still capable of reaching adult hood)?

NOTE: magic does not exist in my story

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  • $\begingroup$ I would imagine having a single eye, and thus losing depth perception, would be rather forcefully selected against in a species that lives in an environment with a lot of cliffs. $\endgroup$ Mar 18 '20 at 20:27
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Yes, it's a real-life thing: Anophtalmia

Anophtalmia is the absence of one or two eyes; people with anophtalmia can survive to adulthood. Since your question only asks for having one eye, this could fit. It's caused by genetic mutations or environmental factors.

It's not impossible that a genetic mutation for anophtalmia could also exist in giants and Yetis; they could also likely acquire it through environmental factors.

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This may be plausible with a lessened form of Cyclopia where only the optic stalk fails to divide, leading to only one eye forming. This eye would have 2 pairs of eyelids, most likely, and the nose may be above the eye, and not be connected to the mouth and respiratory system, meaning that Cyclopes will have to be born able to breathe through the mouth, and also would be unable to produce nasal sounds like 'm' and 'n'

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