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A handful of societies determined last name by profession in some cases, resulting in surnames like Smith, Baker, Butcher, Fisher, Shepherd, Tanner, Schneider, Farmer, etc... Most of these professions (and by extension, surnames) would still exist, of course, but the application of the surname to magical professions could result in surnames like Artificer, Alchemist, Enchanter, Conjurer, and Necromancer.

What other naming schemes would contribute to surnames that do not exist in our world but would in theirs?

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  • $\begingroup$ I cannot even understand what the question asks. The question assumes a naming convention where a person is named Givenname Familyname. Not all cultures use family names, and of those which do use family names not all put them after the given name. (Examples: Aristotle and Plato are just Aristotle and Plato, because the Greek and Hellenistic civilizations did not use family names; in Mr. Xi Jinping's name, "Xi" is the family name and "Jinping" is the given name.) In my own language, family names derived from personal and geographical names vastly outnumber those derived from occupations. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Feb 5 at 20:28
  • $\begingroup$ By surname, I mean the family name. English and German cultures have a number of occupational surnames, but even with other naming conventions, you could get names like Magicburg and Spellshire, as geographical surnames are quite common as well. $\endgroup$ – Beefster Feb 5 at 20:37
  • $\begingroup$ Questions asking about naming things are routinely closed for being primarily opinion-based. This question is kind of like asking, "Everyone has a hammer. What's my neighbor's name?" The two facts are unrelated. $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Feb 5 at 20:39
  • $\begingroup$ And my comment was that (1) not all cultures use family names at all, and (2) in quite a few cultures family names tend to be derived from personal / geographical / ethnic names, with those derived from occupations being a minority. So I still don't understand what is it that the question asks. Just make up a naming convention and go with it. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Feb 5 at 20:39
  • $\begingroup$ This question might have been better for Reddit. Noted. $\endgroup$ – Beefster Feb 5 at 20:40
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A caste system based on the sort of magic you wield. It might not even be so long-winded that you need use the whole word. For instance, a young enchanter who base name is John Wheeler could have "Cha", "Encha" placed as a suffix or prefix in any word of his/her name. Necromancers might have "Cro" or "Nec" as a pre/suffix. John Nec'Wheeler, or John Cha'Wheeler. To vary it up and make it less of an obvious port from those words, assign unique pre/suffixes to names that don't directly correlate to the words WE use for those schools of magic.

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  • $\begingroup$ Why do you think that this is so? This answer is a "just so" story, without any justification. That is, why do you think that your answer is more correct than an answer saying that they use names derived from names of stars and constellations? This is why we don't answer opinion based questions. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Feb 5 at 20:42

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