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I was wondering what anatomy would allow a humanoid creature, where the height of the body is around 4 feet tall, to be able to fly like a hummingbird.

I have read that scaling up a hummingbird even by a little may not be possible as they are constantly flapping their wings and adding more mass would consume too much energy.

As this is an alien creature its musculoskeletal system can be anything to achieve hummingbird like flight, it must be similar to life on earth, so nothing too exotic in its chemistry or mechanisms and the humanoid body will have arms with the wings placed behind them or in an appropriate place.

Is this possible at all and if so how can it be done?

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    $\begingroup$ The problem is that the physics of lift generation doesn't scale up to such a large creature. The way hummingbirds fly is sort-of halfway between the way insects fly and the way "normal" birds fly. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Feb 5 at 13:24
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    $\begingroup$ This reminds me of Toothiana. $\endgroup$ – Renan Feb 6 at 15:29
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    $\begingroup$ @Renan add Liu Kang styled bicycle kicks is it basically is lol $\endgroup$ – RandySavage Feb 6 at 18:47
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    $\begingroup$ See Carnival Row... imdb.com/title/tt0489974 $\endgroup$ – user72081 Feb 6 at 22:35
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    $\begingroup$ @castlewrks oh nice, how have I not seen this yet, it looks ace. $\endgroup$ – RandySavage Feb 6 at 23:15
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As any mechanical designer knows, if you want to increase the frequency of an oscillatory motion, you need to reduce the oscillating masses.

This is why the hummingbird is to little: with bigger masses in its wings, it could not be capable of flipping them back and forth as it does.

Since the bio-mechanics you want to emulate is that one, the only way is to make the humanoid of a similar scale.

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    $\begingroup$ It is just barely possible that a creature larger than a hummingbird could hover. But not through the means they use. And probably not as agilely (only hummingbirds can fly backwards), accurately, nor for as long. And also, not a lot larger. Certain larger birds can briefly hover. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird_flight#Hovering $\endgroup$ – puppetsock Feb 5 at 16:10
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The idea of humanoid birds is not impossible considering birds evolved from bipedal Theropod dinosaurs with long arms and grasping hands. enter image description here Natural selection could definitely have lead to an upright posture in some theropod Dinosaurs which could have allowed them to have a humanoid appearance.

enter image description here

However I do not believe that a humanoid anatomy would support the type of locomotion that is required for flight.

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