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Set in the medieval period around 16th century C.E., all the saline water turns into honey ( avg. viscosity is approximately 10000 centipoise at room temperature). How fast can the medieval people cross it using a transportation(not infrastructure)? (Note: avg. width between ports is 10km and weather is calm all day)

Rules: at least maintain contact with honey 50% of the time in the case of flying and not allowed to traffic honey.

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    $\begingroup$ Without rain from those seas, won't most folks die of hunger when their crops wither? Can't eat the honey - it's polluted with all those dead fish. $\endgroup$
    – user535733
    Feb 5 '20 at 3:25
  • $\begingroup$ @user535733: don't worry they can irrigate water from nearby freshwater lake and those fish are being preserved in honey right? $\endgroup$
    – user6760
    Feb 5 '20 at 3:31
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    $\begingroup$ Only for a limited time. Eventually the lakes will run dry, because the streams feeding the lakes ran dry, because there is no rain, because there are no more oceans. $\endgroup$
    – cowlinator
    Feb 5 '20 at 4:07
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    $\begingroup$ Also, you would eventually have a serious mold or algae problem. Honey is very nutrient dense, and the micro-organism population on your planet would explode. $\endgroup$
    – cowlinator
    Feb 5 '20 at 4:09
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    $\begingroup$ @cowlinator I thought mold or algae have problems with honey because there is no essentially water content for them to survive with. There are stories of ancient jars of honey being discovered and still perfectly edible. $\endgroup$
    – Shadowzee
    Feb 5 '20 at 6:04
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Around the same speed once it crystallizes

All natural honey will eventually crystallize if it's just left on it's own, and it'll be even faster at just the right set of degrees. The ocean is around 62 degrees Farenheit, which is just the right set of degrees. Honey crystallization is due to the overabundance of sugar in honey, which makes it delicious, and the fact that a lot of the water is going to evaporate will speed up the process.

So now you don't have a sticky ocean, you have a slushy ocean on a bed of cold deep ocean super-viscous honey. Which means that if you want to transport somethings, you'd be looking at sleds and runners, basically.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice one! But controlled supersaturation requires lower temperature and appropriate humidity so it would probably takes decades to cross the channel ;D $\endgroup$
    – user6760
    Feb 5 '20 at 6:04

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