-1
$\begingroup$

I am writing a sci-fi story. The availability of materials has big impact on the backstory:

What elements can you find in extreme trace quantities on Earth, but not on the Moon?

What elements can you find in extreme trace quantities on Earth, but not on Mars?

An example of an extreme trace element would be Technetium, atomic number 43...

$\endgroup$
3
  • $\begingroup$ The problem is not so much the lack of any particular elements, but that they are probably not going to be concentrated into exploitable ores. Many ores are formed by hydrothermal processes (or in the case of iron, biological ones). Those processes won't have existed on the Moon, and probably were much less common on Mars. $\endgroup$
    – jamesqf
    Jan 12 '20 at 4:57
  • $\begingroup$ Questions asking to compile lists are not welcome here $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Jan 12 '20 at 6:30
  • $\begingroup$ Forget elemental differences. The differences will all be mineral ones. $\endgroup$ Jan 12 '20 at 9:42
2
$\begingroup$

There are unlikely to be any such elements at all

The moon appears to be pretty much the same as Earth in terms of chemical composition, in fact this is part of the basis for the Theia Impact hypothesis.

For the Technetium example you reference, it is certain to be found on the moon in trace amounts, because it is found in uranium ore and uranium has been detected on the moon.

Mars goes vary someone what composition (our data is more limited than the moon, but less than you might think as we have evidence from meteors from Mars, samples from Mars rovers, and spectral analysis from Mars satellites), but the differences we see are variations in concentrations not a different set of elements.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.