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First question: if you melted Europa's ice, would there be any land?

Second question (assuming the answer to the first question is no), how much water would you have to remove after that in order to get any land?

Another way of asking the question would be, what are the highest underwater volcanoes/mountains on Europa? I understand that currently it's about 10-15 miles of ice, and then 40-100 miles of ocean underneath that. So I'm guessing a lot of water would have to be removed to get the first islands but I'm having a lot of difficulty finding an answer online.

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    $\begingroup$ For a rough estimate, I would look at Io's mountains. The highest one is 6.3 km high. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountains_of_Io $\endgroup$ – TheDyingOfLight Dec 31 '19 at 21:13
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    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Europa_(moon)#Subsurface_ocean - " it is estimated that the outer crust of solid ice is approximately 10–30 km (6–19 mi) thick,[62] including a ductile "warm ice" layer, which could mean that the liquid ocean underneath may be about 100 km (60 mi) deep.[63] This leads to a volume of Europa's oceans of 3 × 1018 m3, between two or three times the volume of Earth's oceans" $\endgroup$ – SurpriseDog Dec 31 '19 at 21:35
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to WorldBuilding! This is a good post, but I want you to be aware that asking a multi-part question in the same post causes problems. In this case, one question is essentially a restatement of the main question. In the future, if you really have follow up questions, you'll get much better answers if you ask one question, wait for it to be answered, and then ask another question separately. We have many years of experience getting people the best quality results! :-) Hope to see you contributing more to the community in the future! $\endgroup$ – SRM Dec 31 '19 at 21:47
  • $\begingroup$ Would this be better suited for space exploration or astronomy? According to space.com, Europa would have a rocky mantle and iron core much like Earth just that it is covered in solid ice. $\endgroup$ – user6760 Dec 31 '19 at 23:10
  • $\begingroup$ @SRM thanks for letting me know $\endgroup$ – levininja Jan 2 at 14:14
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According to NASA:

From ground-based telescopes, scientists knew that Europa's surface is mostly water ice, and scientists have found strong evidence that beneath the ice crust is an ocean of liquid water or slushy ice. In 1979 the two Voyager spacecraft passed through the Jovian system, providing the first hints that Europa might contain liquid water. Then ground-based telescopes on Earth, along with the Galileo spacecraft and space telescopes, have increased scientists’ confidence for a Europan ocean.

Scientists think Europa’s ice shell is 10 to 15 miles (15 to 25 kilometers) thick, floating on an ocean 40 to 100 miles (60 to 150 kilometers) deep.

So melting all the ice would reveal no land.

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As others have already explained, it would not be feasible to melt all of Europa’s ice, even for an alien species with advanced technology and nearly limitless energy resources. Even if you were to melt all of its ice somehow, you would just have a water world like many that already exist within the habitable zones of distant stars—one that would freeze over immediately. And that water world’s oceans would be dozens of miles deeper than any on earth. The only rock in Europa is the rocky core, which is way too deep to be exposed by melting ice.

Some context would be helpful. If you’re looking for an ice world or an ocean world with volcanic islands, there are literally trillions of those out there—just not in our solar system. Have you considered either Titan or Io as a possible alternative setting? Io is the most volcanically active body in our solar system, and Titan has oceans of liquid hydrocarbons on its mostly rocky surface.

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    $\begingroup$ I've been investigating each of the moons around Jupiter to see how each one might possibly be colonized. Europa strikes me as one of the hardest. I've found posts about several different ways of colonizing it but hadn't seen one that involved melting all the ice. Nearly unlimited energy is fine my worldbuilding, so I wanted to rule out the possibility of melting the ice before moving onto focusing on other methods. $\endgroup$ – levininja Jan 2 at 14:18
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I think the answer has to be no land. Would be visable. As to how deep the ocean is and how far beneath the sea the nearest land is we simply don’t know for sure. I would estimate tens to a few hundred miles deep.

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