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In my universe, humans were seeded on Earth by an advanced race. They were also seeded on other planets, notably Jupiter, Neptune, Venus, and some others in other star systems. They were given a large metal plate in the atmosphere on the gas giants, and were set on the ground on the terrestrial planets. They were seeded there in their deciding stages.

How might they evolve as compared to Earth humans? Would they even survive?

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    $\begingroup$ "Would they even survive?" yes? If the aliens have the tech, means, and ambition to put humans on multiple planets, I guess, they'll also at least let them survive by...some means. Either changing the base model to match the environment or modify the environment or whatever. But if you just drop some humans on a different planet, I doubt they'll survive. $\endgroup$ – VLAZ Dec 11 '19 at 15:44
  • $\begingroup$ Since Homo Gmo is designed by the alien, wouldn't there be any instruction manual and warranty too? $\endgroup$ – user6760 Dec 11 '19 at 16:19
  • $\begingroup$ Edits cannot invalidate existing answers. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Dec 11 '19 at 16:21
  • $\begingroup$ Humans can't live, but they could have seeded a different species designed for the planet conditions. Life could be existed on mars millions of years ago. $\endgroup$ – Stefano Balzarotti Dec 11 '19 at 16:49
  • $\begingroup$ No, of course not. Humans cannot survive without extensive tech on any other planet in the solar system. A large metal plate? Come on. Pick a single planet with something vaguely survivable and ask about that planet. $\endgroup$ – puppetsock Dec 12 '19 at 14:52
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How might they evolve as compared to Earth Humans? Would they even survive?

Let's look at all the planets in our solar system:

  • Mercury: atmosphere-less and scorched by the Sun, any human on it would be history within seconds.
  • Venus: highly corrosive atmosphere, extremely high temperature and no liquid water. Also here a human on its surface would be steamed to death within seconds
  • Mars: too cold and with a too thin atmosphere, with no water on the surface. A human on its surface would be frozen to death within seconds, or asphyxiate in the same amount of time.
  • Jupiter: no liquid water, no oxygen. A human floating in its atmosphere would suffocate within seconds.
  • Saturn: no liquid water, no oxygen. A human floating in its atmosphere would suffocate within seconds.
  • Uranus: no liquid water, no oxygen. A human floating in its atmosphere would suffocate within seconds.
  • Neptune: no liquid water, no oxygen. A human floating in its atmosphere would suffocate within seconds.

Evolution requires reproduction. Few seconds are not enough for a pair of humans to reproduce.

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    $\begingroup$ "Few seconds are not enough for a pair of humans to reproduce" ah... Umm... Well... I was told it happens to everybody, OK? $\endgroup$ – VLAZ Dec 11 '19 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ You don’t freeze to death that fast at typical Martian surface temperatures. You’ll definitely asphyxiate first. $\endgroup$ – Mike Scott Dec 11 '19 at 15:49
  • $\begingroup$ @VLAZ, what you were told involve just the part where the pair is strictly needed. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Dec 11 '19 at 15:54
  • $\begingroup$ @L.Dutch-ReinstateMonica isn't there oxygen on Europa. It seems contadictory to my question, but still $\endgroup$ – Hunt Castle Dec 11 '19 at 16:55
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    $\begingroup$ @HuntCastle, Europa is not a planet, and you asked about planets $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Dec 12 '19 at 6:06
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Genetic Adaptation

E.T parents started their efforts to colonize the galaxy, sending thousands of little seed drones.

These where really small craft ships with an IA and 3D printing capabilities, more often than not, they would found a planet and start studying it. Depending in the conditions they would change the genetic code to make a living population thrive in such conditions. With the only restriction is that a human level intelligence and a gregarious disposition should remain in the creature created.

Thousands of years have pass and they are still founding new trade partners or archaeological dig sites. Miss Universe have never been the same since the first encounter.

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    $\begingroup$ Upvoted for the miss universe line $\endgroup$ – cyber101 Dec 11 '19 at 16:43
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First correction that I'll assume is for the gas giants: I'm assuming you want humans to land on the moons of these planets, not on the planet itself.

Either way, with the notable exceptions of Venus (with its runaway greenhouse effect) and Mercury (being very close to the sun), our solar system is a pretty cold place. So assuming that humans were seeded with genetic modifications needed to survive these planets initially, the general 'added features' to a human would include:

  • Thicker/More insulating skin and/or more hair to keep warm
  • Slower metabolism, allowing us to not burn through all our fat, muscles, calories, etc. too quickly
  • Bigger eyes, specifically pupils, to help us see (most planets/moons don't see as much sunlight as we do)
  • Ability to dig (but like really well) may be helpful because most planets/moons with exception of Venus and Titan don't have notable atmospheres and magnetic fields to speak of, exposing us to whatever comes at us from the sky (such as all the radiation).
  • Radiation tolerance so we don't immediately get cancer
  • Massive lungs so we can breathe whatever oxygen there is (if we're still oxygen dependent)
  • Lungs that can breathe other things like CO2 because O2 isn't easy to find
  • High tolerance to terrible air regardless of whether it's because it's full of chemicals or because there isn't much of it in the first place
  • Glow in the dark features to help us see things around us like those deep-sea fish
  • Advanced swimming skills if we're on a moon like Enceladus (assuming we live underneath its icy surface) or Titan (and its hydrocarbon oceans).
  • Immunity to toxic chemicals because there's plenty to go around

All further adaptations that may take place would most likely improve upon the above-mentioned features. Is there a chance that we see these beings adapting by mutating completely new features? Yes (especially because of all the radiation that exists in space and especially coming from the Jovian planets will definitely cause mutations over time, or just kill us tbh). Over millions of years, one could probably still tell that these different humanoids stemmed from the same species, but we would look notably different, be of different species. Chimps are only 1-4% apart from us in terms of DNA, and we aren't exactly having conversations with them, so even this much of a difference can make us different enough over millions of years (even if we were to interact with one another somehow).

Also - because I'm an Expanse fan, there's a good chance that these humans will be like 2 meters tall on average because of lower gravity on most of these planets/moons. Also, the humans on Venus and Mercury will most likely have the following adaptations (notice the repeats):

  • Skin that dissipates heat really fast or thick heat-shields for skin so we don't melt
  • Immunity to extreme heat - kind of works with what I said above
  • High pressure tolerance because Venus hits 93 bars of pressure on the surface
  • Slower metabolism, allowing us to not burn through all our fat, muscles, calories, etc. too quickly
  • Smaller eyes, specifically pupils, to help us see (because it's so bright all the time near the sun and when your atmosphere glows yellow like hell)
  • Ability to dig (but like really well) may be helpful because even Venus and Titan have very toxic/unstable environments, so it might be safer to stay underground.
  • Radiation tolerance so we don't immediately get cancer
  • Massive lungs so we can breathe whatever oxygen there is (if we're still oxygen dependent)
  • Lungs that can breathe other things like CO2 because O2 isn't easy to find
  • High tolerance to terrible air regardless of whether it's because it's full of chemicals or because there isn't much of it in the first place
  • Immunity to toxic chemicals because there's plenty to go around

Keep in mind that the explanation of adaptations I have given assumes that these adaptations will be enough to help us survive. It probably still isn't in the more extreme cases. One guarantee that I can give you is that without any modifications to humans as we are, we have no chance surviving for over 2 minutes anywhere else. And that's the best case scenario, because that's approximately how long most of us can hold our breath. Without mods, we're as good as dead, and these mods better be good.

Edit: Just noticed that humans will be living on metal plates in the atmosphere of the gas giants. The average height of humans may change depending on how much atmospheric pressure they're dealing with and how 'heavy' they are at that given height. This could make these humans shorter/stockier and more compact than we are. Also, I cannot stress this enough, we can't breathe in any of these places, and the chemicals that exist in some of these planetary bodies are downright toxic. At some point I think that we'd have more in common (physically) with deep-sea creatures/monsters than with ourselves.

I hope this helps!

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    $\begingroup$ This is a really good answer. It pretty much fits what I was thinking. $\endgroup$ – Hunt Castle Dec 11 '19 at 17:02
  • $\begingroup$ That's good to hear! Thanks @HuntCastle! Btw I just noticed that you stated 'metal plates around the gas giants' in your question, so I'm going to add a bit to my answer soon. $\endgroup$ – cyber101 Dec 11 '19 at 17:04
  • $\begingroup$ @HuntCastle Alright I think the answer I have given now is more 'full' and takes care of more problems. $\endgroup$ – cyber101 Dec 11 '19 at 17:12
  • $\begingroup$ I wasn't sure about what your metal plate orbiting the gas giants was like so you can pick and choose features from either list depending on the physical conditions on said plates. $\endgroup$ – cyber101 Dec 11 '19 at 17:14
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Short answer then wouldnt nothing human temotly human like wouod suvive on those planets they would habe to be seed on earth like planets

If they were on earth like planets they would probally not that different then us there would be some difference of cource but not that more diferent then lets one race from another. In oder for human to surive the must be in a similuar environment and that means similar evolution.

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the planets you listed wouldn't work, humans are animals, and evolution is just genetic adaptation over the course of many generations, typically this change is brought about by the need to survive this is natural selection.

Other times these changes are brought on by sexual selection, like peacocks and the males tails feathers, they don't provide a easier way to survive, but they do make reproduction more likely so it still makes breeding down to the next generation more likely

Some evolutionary changes just happen to occur, and because they aren't harmful they're a new trait, think humans and blue eyes, blue ares are a pretty new trait, but they don't really aid or harm in chances of survival or the probability of breeding when looking at it over the course of many generations.

I'd advise picking (making up) earth like planets but with certain different environmental factors changed for example:

Higher gravity,

Less slightly less Oxygen in the atmosphere,

Replace the nitrogen in the atmosphere with another gas, (a non-toxic one)

Maybe make water rarer so people have adapted to use less water?

Maybe the planet is in tidal lock with its star, so one side always faces the sun, and is lethally hot, while the other always faces away from the sun, and so is lethally cold.

So the vast majority of humans live in the middle area where it is always twilight. but maybe some groups have moved towards/away from the sun and have started, or have completely adapted to the cold/hot temperatures

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Can I rephrase the question by replacing 'Humans' by 'Life' : How might life evolve on other planets. The advanced race may would have seeded Earth with a primitive, unicellular lifeform, -- LUCA, Last Universally Common Ancestor. From that point onward we have evolved into a whole group of living things that have evolved on Earth. On Saturn ( or rather Titan and almost surely on Enceladus) they could most easily evolve into something very comparable to humans. On Titan, the biology would be based on hydrocarbons and Enceladus has enough water, carbon and warmth to sustain life, if it was planted there. Mars definitely would have been a good enough place especially when it had more water and atmosphere and I am sure intelligent Martians would have either adapted to the Climate Change or would have found some technical solution.

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  • $\begingroup$ There is a clear difference between humans and life. OP is asking about humans. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Dec 12 '19 at 6:29
  • $\begingroup$ Can I rephrase the question by replacing 'Humans' by 'Life' You could, but that changes the question as much as to making your answer completely useless. $\endgroup$ – Rekesoft Dec 12 '19 at 8:28

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