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Imagine ftl space travel that requires modifications to the human body enabling them to survive in space without a spacesuit, possibly even truly skyclad. What mechanism for ftl travel might require this? Why can't a spaceship be used? Or a spacesuit? Or possibly even clothes, and if that extreme, what can be brought along?

I do not require, but might prefer, that the mechanism be carried on the person's.... person; if an external mechanism giving the person a push (i.e. fixed portal or beam or flying alongside a ship, etc.) is interesting enough, that might be sufficient; but in general, it would be nice to give the person at least some ability/freedom to maneuver themselves.

I am also willing to allow that there might be some other ftl mechanism in existence, allowing for interstellar trade and spaceships at the origin and destination to overcome atmospheric exit and reentry, if the personal mechanism cannot overcome these issues; but if there is another ftl mechanism, why is this one preferred? What other relevant questions need to be answered?

Just for clarity's sake, I am not asking What modifications would be needed to allow humans to survive in space with limited protective gear; I am asking what might cause an ftl mechanism to require such modifications. Handwavium will work fine for the how of flying skyclad; I'm looking for a good reason for why they have to do so.

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    $\begingroup$ This question is asking more for ideas on how you achieve a specific goal. This is entirely opinion based for a question that deals entirely with fictional material as all FTL travel methods are theoretical at best. You can come up with whatever reason you want, and simply explain it away in any number of methods. I might recommend you try to come up with a theory yourself and then ask whether or not that is feasible, or if there are any other conditions to consider. $\endgroup$ – TitaniumTurtle Dec 6 '19 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ An incredibly complex, but interesting example that might be related is in the Ender Saga. In the 3rd book it is determined, in an incredibly simplified explanation, that FTL travel can be achieved by imagining yourself outside the universe and then back in the universe in a different spot. There is literally an entire book about how this works and comes about etc, but a key rule is you can only bring what you can take on your person. I'm sure someone is more than willing to argue the details with me, because the series is also a heavy handed discussion on philosophy. $\endgroup$ – TitaniumTurtle Dec 6 '19 at 18:52
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FTL travel requires entering a hyperspace-like state, in which, though lightspeed is still a limiting factor, distances between corresponding points are greatly reduced -- for instance, to reach Alpha Centauri from Sol via hyperspace may be a journey of only a few kilometers, easily managed in minutes with fairly basic methods.

The catch is that, in hyperspace, gases don't exert pressure as they do in normal space. This causes interesting problems for things like rocket propulsion, but much moreso for transporting living organisms. When the first rats came back with their eyes popped out and skin ripped from internal (liquid) pressure, and necropsy revealed they had suffocated, it was almost the end of the Interstellar Initiative.

For a while, everything was done with probes, using mass drivers for propulsion and equipment designed not to rely on gas pressure to operate -- but that doesn't do anything for colonization. Eventually, it was found that cryopreservation would allow transporting living organisms (once means were invented to revive them). However, someone needs to run the train, so to speak.

That led to the "space people" experiments. People whose bodies contained no gases (other than those dissolved in liquid or bound in organic molecules) and who could survive several hours of unprotected exposure to vacuum.

Their endurance limits single hyperjumps to a range of around thirty light years (though this varies with an individual's ability to store oxygen) -- but with an hour or two in normal space and atmosphere to "refill", multi-jump trips can be of arbitrary length.

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A network of "gates" that scan content and only send living beings.

You could use as your FTL system something analogous to the Stargate network: a series of devices at different locations, built using inscrutible technology by an advanced (extinct? ascended?) alien species, which can transport living beings to other devices in the network near-instaneously. For unknown reasons (prevention of transporting weapons or wealth, perhaps?), the creators of the system programmed the devices to send only material that meets their own strict definition of "living being".

Probably experiments would be tried to test the limits of the device's scanners--people wearing glasses or pacemakers won't be sent; people holding a small gold nugget won't be sent, but someone who had eaten the same gold nugget would be; viruses aren't sent but bacteria are; ...make your restrictions as you see fit.

But the point is, a person wearing clothes isn't sent, and a person surrounded by a cloud of air isn't sent--the traveler must be "skyclad", in vacuum, at least long enough for the device to scan and decide it's safe to send.

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The need for space survival is only coincidental

It's not that your passengers need to survive actual space, it's just that conditions inside an ftl ship are harsh in ways that are similar to being naked in space.

One theoretical method of ftl travel is the alcubierre drive which has been theorized, if it could be built, would expose the passengers of the ship with deadly levels of radiation. If a human had modifications to make them essentially immune to radiation, not only would they have an easier time surviving in space without a suit, they would also be the only ones capable of operating a ship that uses an alcubierre drive.

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