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Just as the title, is there a scientific or possible way to extract past memory from a person brain into some record such as video or visual player ?

I know some theory say that it possible to duplicate neuron pattern to duplicate memory but since human brain have different pattern it is almost impossible, so I want it to turn into real visual to be seen rather than directly into other person.

something similar in paycheck movie

its not necessary using today's technology, but at least achievable in the future or might be theoretically possible.

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    $\begingroup$ Same comment as to your other question: The answer to this essentially comes down to the tech level - current day tech: no; future - at some point probably yes. If you can clarify what kind of tech/science level answer you want, it should be possible to write an answer that isn't 'that depends' $\endgroup$ – Nicolai Nov 16 '19 at 10:27
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    $\begingroup$ The thing is, at present we simply don't know how memories are stored in the brain. We do know that they are not stored as video; the brain simply does not have the bandwidth and computing power to store and retrieve video clips. To the best of current understanding, memories are more in the nature of scripts, and when retrieved the brain supplies a sort of virtual reality to play back the scripts. (Think how a video game generates the scenes: they are not stored as video or pictures, but rendered on demand by the game engine. A different game engine may render a scene differently.) $\endgroup$ – AlexP Nov 16 '19 at 13:20
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    $\begingroup$ Yes but you can only play it back on a brain of the same make and model, as brains from different manufacturers are not compatible. $\endgroup$ – A. I. Breveleri Nov 16 '19 at 15:13
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Brain scans nowadays can image live the activity of the brain, in particular PET scans.

And those scans can be played back like a clip.

However, as far as I know those scans can image the activation of brain areas, thus you can see them as highly compressed and encoded version of the person's memory.

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    $\begingroup$ PET (positron emission tomography) scans measure energy usage in the brain and while this correlates to activity in specific area's, it will never be possible to infer (synaptic / electric) activity of individual neurons from them, which would be needed to 'extract memory' in any way. $\endgroup$ – Nicolai Nov 16 '19 at 10:26
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    $\begingroup$ @Nicolai, exactly. that's why I state "compressed and encoded" $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Nov 16 '19 at 11:14
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If you really need to stretch an answer, perhaps you could conduct memory recall through guided lucid dreaming/hypnosis/sleepwalking and a VR simulation of a known environment.

So think about this as forensic scene recreation rather than memory stealing in the vein of "Inception".

Tldr: Occulus/Vive but the visuals are pre-engineered locations, but also with a dynamic asset generation by the dreamer in a pseudo map editor feature.

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