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I was thinking of an interesting landmark to put on my conworld, and I went with the "large body of acid" trope. This lake would be about the size of Lake Superior, and near the equator. The atmosphere is very similar to Earth's, but with about 5% Argon comprising it. The underlying rock has high concentrations of minerals like quartz and graphite, with some other minerals like lazulite and diamond. It is a very dense rock and is good at insulating against radiation. What colour would this acid lake be?

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    $\begingroup$ Id have to go ahead and admit here, if the atmosphere was 5% argon, I would wonder how low peoples voices would be. Argon is a heavy gas that causes sound to slow down. I doubt this would effect a lake of sulfuric acid though, but im not enept enough in chemistry to tell you anything. $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 2:01
  • $\begingroup$ The question, as asked, really can't be answered: you don't give enough information to give a proper answer. For example, what kinds of rocks underly the lake? This is an invented world, who's to say the underlying rock isn't acid-proof? This will drastically affect the correct answer. $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 2:10
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    $\begingroup$ @elemtilas I have clarified these details $\endgroup$
    – Greenie E.
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 2:34
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    $\begingroup$ Cncentrated sulphuric acid is a very powerful dehydrating agent. If left in the open it will absorb moisture from the atmosphere and dilute itself. $\endgroup$
    – Slarty
    Commented Nov 15, 2019 at 16:46

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Given the chemical composition of the underlying rock, I'd suspect that the lake will actually be a kind of ordinary darkish brown.

The pretty blue of Earth's acid lakes is due to iron sulphate in the solution. The pretty blue of sulphur lakes is due to the flame's colour.

On this other world, the underlying rock is defined by high concentrations of quartz and graphite, with some other minerals like lazulite and diamond.

Diamond and graphite (carbon) are insoluble in sulphuric acid. Quartz is highly resistant as well and won't be dissolved in sulphuric acid. Lazulite is also insoluble in sulphuric acid.

Sulphuric acid itself, like water, is clear, and will take on the apparent colour of whatever is behind it:

indiamart.com

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  • $\begingroup$ Water is clear but not colorless. If a water lake is even as little as 10 meters deep, the bottom is not very colorful and is free of contaminants, it would appear transparent but slightly blue. From wikipedia: "Pure water has a slight blue color that becomes a deeper green as the thickness of the observed sample increases. The blue hue of water is an intrinsic property and is caused by selective absorption and scattering of white light." That being said, what about sulphuric acid? I doubt H₂SO₄ is colorless even if we are talking about a deep lake made of it, makes no sense 2 me. $\endgroup$
    – DeMooniC
    Commented Jul 8, 2021 at 8:46
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Turquoise

enter image description here

Largest Acid Lake on Earth

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    $\begingroup$ That blue is the colour of iron sulphate The lake's actual colour will depend on the underlying rock. $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 2:11
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Sulfuric Acid Lakes, like Thorne said, are presented as Turquoise.

Very Very Sulfuric Lands can be an Orange-Yellow, or Green, depending on the concentration of sulfur.

But one very important feature... Multan Sulfur, usually around Sulfur Lakes, will Light on Fire at night, producing a beautiful but deadly blue fire or blue lava

I loved the idea of adding this in, and had to mention the blue lava. its an amazing sight

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ In reality, sulfur lava isnt necessarily blue, but it gives off a blue flame on the surface, giving that glowing blue cracked land look. $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 2:07
  • $\begingroup$ has to do with oxidation and chemicals reacting with rock and air. $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 14, 2019 at 10:43

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