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Due to the world being based more on magic than actual science, I have a "planet" with changing season everywhere. A "sun" orbits it roughly near the equator, but it only gives light, it doesn't change temperature. The region on the "north pole" ends up with temperatures similar to temperate zone on Earth, but the light will be very weak, or missing completely for long stretches of time (and then stay for long stretches of time). Can you think of some ways to have plants (or even animals) adapted to that, which are preferably also useful for humanoids? Magic could fix that, but I would prefer to keep it to minimum.

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This (seasonal low light) issue already has a solution in nature. Deciduous plants, migratory birds and hibernating animals are well adapted to a drastic change of seasons. More interesting question would be - if there are hot summers and relatively warm winters, how things would be different?

I suspect there would be much higher activity of wood eating insects, while those dependent on green plants would be less prominent. In turn, that would make nocturnal animals more numerous, with entire food chain being skewed in "night" direction. All non-migratory and non-hibernating animals would need to develop good sense of smell and hearing.

Humans would be at disadvantage in this world. But nothing stops us to develop better nighttime skills too. Maybe all people, including girls, would have whiskers? :)

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Nature provides this solution.

There are too many to list, but there are hundreds of plants that do well in low-light conditions.

In fact, even among normal plants such as English ivy you can notice it adapting to low-light. You can see this sometimes by looking at the size of the leaves near the center of a bush or tree: To compensate for most light being blocked by outer leaves, the leaves are often much larger the further inward you go into the plant.

If you're interested in a study on this adaptation behavior, see this.

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If the polar region was also highly volcanic a lot of energy could be imparted to the surroundings by volcanic activity, either directly from lava flows or indirectly from geysers and thermal springs. If the polar area was a giant dormant super volcano like Yellowstone Park in the US the area could be quite extensive, and increased volcanism could lead to increased temperatures.

To further aid temperature increases if the rock was black it would absorb whatever light there was aiding the warming further.

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