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So basically I've noticed that many exaggerated weapons such as axes and hammers are cool looking or rather intimidating but are unwieldy. Even if the wielder supposedly has super strength it does not sound like an acceptable excuse.

Lets say a very skilled craftsman wanted to create such a weapon, for arguments sake lets make it a very exaggerated halberd. What method could be used to shift the weapons balance, making it more balanced when spinning it around and unbalanced to put more force behind a strike? enter image description here The level of technology is medieval but said craftsman has more knowledge of metals and their properties as well as being precise enough to carve minute mechanisms.

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    $\begingroup$ "Minute mechanisms" aren't going to play well with a hefty melee weapon... $\endgroup$ – Starfish Prime Oct 27 '19 at 17:06
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    $\begingroup$ What does that weapon look like and how is it supposed to be used? I know what a halberd is but I'm not sure what an exaggerated halberd would be - is it longer? Is the head of the weapon more like a war axe that you can see in games/moves (enormous, two-handed axes). Then what is "spinning it around"? You turn it in your hands with your body static? Or perhaps turning your body with the blade, like in a "whirlwind"-type attack (hold the weapon away from the body and spin with yourself as the axis)? $\endgroup$ – VLAZ Oct 27 '19 at 17:21
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This kind of thing has actually been done. The Indian Tulwar in this video is hollow, and full of ball bearings. When you swing the sword, the ball bearings fly to the end of the blade. The example in the video is small, so the change in balance would be minor, but imagine doing this kind of thing with a big polearm. Also imagine using something heavier than steel for the internal weights, maybe mercury.

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    $\begingroup$ Now imagine having to lift it and use it in battle. I'm not convinced that a big weapon with a lot more weight added to it will be very practical as it's going to be very tiring to use and swing. It's like the unrealistic "war axes" you see in fiction but worse. $\endgroup$ – VLAZ Oct 27 '19 at 17:26
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    $\begingroup$ It wouldn't be heavier, because significant portions of it would be hollow. It works just like trim weights in aircraft. They don't need to be extremely heavy to alter the balance of the weapon. It's no more tiring to swing than a similarly sized weapon that isn't hollow with ball bearings inside, but it WILL be more nimble when parrying. $\endgroup$ – Ryan_L Oct 27 '19 at 17:46
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    $\begingroup$ Mercury was used in a sci-fi novel. I cannot remember all that much about the book but it was weird. The planets name was "Urth". The main character was some sort of apprentice Torturer/Executioner, and his sword had a center channel filled partially with mercury. it was balanced for simple parries but on a full swing the mercury would slide up the channel to impart more weight to the swing. I was going to use this as a full answer, but you already covered it. $\endgroup$ – Paul TIKI Oct 29 '19 at 21:39
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Counterweight.

sledgehammer angle grinder

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEn3QIzQcFA

Polearms often had a weighted butt. For one it protected the wood from the ground. For two you could whack or jab people with it when the head of the polearm was in the wrong position. For three it put the center of gravity in the middle of the pole, which is what you are looking for.

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